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BrummieBen


Latest posts by BrummieBen

Expensive perennial plug plants

Posted: 28/05/2013 at 20:54

I find with perenials they will always be poor from mail order. I keep an eye out while on my trips and if I spy something nice, I'll knock the door and ask for a root cutting in autumn. It always helps when I tell them the stock I can offer too! This year I've really gone mad with the seeds, everyday I'm primping, watering, pricking out and potting on. Running out of space, so hopefully make a good few quid at table-top sales and carboots over next month or so. Use the cash to spend on pots, exotic equipment, compost and poly pots! Oh and I made the mistake of offering to grow 200 russian giant for my daughter's primary school to sell!

update...greenhouse on breezeblocks..attaching base???

Posted: 26/05/2013 at 10:23

The spikes are to go into the ground either in soil or concreted in. You could still use them by drilling out appropriate holes in the breezeblocks then making up a fine grade concrete filling then fitting spikes in. I would be more tempted to cut them off and use screws and rawl plugs every foot or so. 2" screws will be fine. Regards to the door, is it on hinges? Or does it slide? If it slides does it not require the 'step' for it to be correctly supported and guided when closing? If it's hinged, then you will essentially be leaving that '2 ft portion' as a hole? What's your plan to keep it sealed?

The step is a pain granted, but if you have the space how about making a gradual ramp of maybe 3 or 4 foot up to the lip of the frame? It would be very gradual and there's no step and less headache than cutting the frame up! Also not sure what that will do to the stability, the greenhouse gets it's strength from the box frame at it's base, which you plan to compromise. Think very carefully before cutting the frame, there's no going back !!!!

Hope I've helped you have a few more thoughts. Oh, I have a dremel so I use that to cut aluminium. How ever I'm sure a fine toothed hacksaw blade would do as well. Wouldn't recommend a junior hacksaw, you'll be there for weeks! Good luck and let us know how you get on.

Buying compost online?

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:25

Usually the cost of courier is prohibitive. If you are worrying about the weight in your car, think like this, a 120litre bag (provided it's not sopping wet) probably weighs a third of an average adult. Well that's what I find when lifting them. So if you have a 4 seater, then should carry 6 or 8 bags easily. When creating raised beds it's important to dig down maybe 6 inches, I also sift this through a half inch size sieve. Then start filling the bed up, I start with compost/manure first, a few inches, then a couple inches thick of soil. It is important to mix soil with the compost otherwise when the compost dries, it's difficult to wet again, also the soil gives the mix 'weight' meaning when dry it won't be blown away!.

When you are about halfway full, tramp lightly over the whole bed, then fill to a couple of inches from the top. I always tramp down at half full otherwise after a few weeks when the soil settles with watering, your level will drop by 3 inches! Good luck.

Right Plant Wrong Soil !

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:10

You could make a raised bed, but dig down about 2 or 3 feet as well then fill with ericaceous compost. If you use ericaceous feed that will help. Pretty sure you can buy a product to mix in a watering can to help maintain a more acidic soil too. Have a gander at this :

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=82

clematis

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:05

probably better off knocking up a trough from pallets or decking planks. Line the inside sides with gardening polythene (except the bottom!). I'd go for a foot to 18 inch high, and as wide as you like, you also can then plant up with bulbs for spring and bedding for the summer . Make sure you have good drainage and remember to water! Building a trough is not only satisfying, but also you can make it exactly the right size for your garden. Good luck!

pruning clematis Montana

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 11:56

prune as hard as you like, provided you give it some feed every week it'll soon recover and take over again.

Cactus or.....,....

Posted: 19/05/2013 at 21:06

Shady window box, surely  primula's with some bulbs and some nice varigated ivy?

Greenhouse Advice

Posted: 18/05/2013 at 21:56

umm more like massively, I went aluminium purely because I didn't want to spend literally years of my life sorting the wood out! Regards to the wood being a couple of degrees warmer, that maybe, but if you are actually going to keep plants that can't take frost, you will have heat. Wood does look great, but if you want trouble free (and much cheaper) GH stuff, I'd go Alu all the way. I'd way prefer to have safety glass, bar capping and all the extras even staging, than have a wooden greenhouse. Oh and you'd still have money left over for plants. Wooden GH cost loads of cash for a decent one, my uncle ran a plant nursery for about 30 years, he had maybe 10 GH. Yes, the wooden ones are sentimental, but purely from memories of repairs etc. On asking him, he'd go alu everytime now, the peace of mind and the fact they are like half the price means the choice is made.

Plum tree

Posted: 18/05/2013 at 21:41

If a stand alone, I'd take a third back off both leaders to about an inch above a dormant bud. That should make it sprout out like crazy, keep taking top third of shoots til you get desired shape. Good luck.

tulips losing their heads

Posted: 18/05/2013 at 12:17

I have doubles, the main culprit is actually the rain. The rain fills the flower and makes them fall over or snap, couple it with the gusty wind we had last week, means lots of mine have ended up in cups around the house!

Discussions started by BrummieBen

growing brassicas

Replies: 13    Views: 1474
Last Post: 09/08/2013 at 14:21

clematis - The President

Prune or not?? 
Replies: 11    Views: 924
Last Post: 11/06/2013 at 23:07

The Dreaded Red Spider Mite

It's back, trying biological control this time. 
Replies: 7    Views: 737
Last Post: 14/06/2013 at 00:17

bulbs, daffs, tulips, hyacinths, alliums

Replies: 7    Views: 830
Last Post: 17/05/2013 at 10:00

Going to try the theory of 2 cuts a week

Replies: 16    Views: 17549
Last Post: 12/05/2013 at 19:53

water those poor souls!

Replies: 8    Views: 627
Last Post: 20/04/2013 at 09:35

Back after a long slog

Replies: 3    Views: 477
Last Post: 18/04/2013 at 22:46

anyone else think this 'extended' winter, means a good summer

as above 
Replies: 11    Views: 788
Last Post: 23/03/2013 at 12:46

So lyon, change your name back to Gary, wondering why?

well not really 
Replies: 4    Views: 667
Last Post: 23/03/2013 at 09:28

Fine Green beans in the shops

What are they? 
Replies: 13    Views: 1208
Last Post: 20/03/2013 at 18:33

This made me spill my tea over the keyboard!

Replies: 9    Views: 801
Last Post: 10/03/2013 at 12:09

Your Favourite Tools

The ones you use most! 
Replies: 26    Views: 1257
Last Post: 10/03/2013 at 14:56

Needing old mouse or vole nests

Bumble Bee nestbox project 
Replies: 6    Views: 621
Last Post: 11/03/2013 at 19:48

While it's been raining

trawling youtube for gardening 
Replies: 5    Views: 634
Last Post: 08/03/2013 at 19:47

Most famous moment with your plants?

meeting a big cheese 
Replies: 7    Views: 572
Last Post: 03/03/2013 at 10:25
1 to 15 of 22 threads