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Charlie November


Latest posts by Charlie November

1 to 10 of 605

How did this happen?

Posted: 30/06/2015 at 18:00

If that's the perennial Oriental poppy and definitely part of the same plant not a seedling growing through it, I'd say a mutation arose or reverted and that whole stem grew from it. Maybe they get meiosis in their mitosis some times.

Could be worse. Imagine having to explain spontaneous melanism in mammalian offspring to an understandably suspicious father.

Camera Corner

Posted: 29/06/2015 at 19:21

Runnybeak:

Lindau am Bodensee - Riefensberg - Diedamskopf - Schoppernau - Steeg - Kaiserjoch - Pettneu am Arlberg - Gries im Sellrain - Buch in Tirol - Zell am Ziller - Gerlos - Wald im Pinzgau - Uttendorf - Dorfgastein.

18 days.

Need your inhaler?

Rabbits

Posted: 29/06/2015 at 18:56

Yeah ... keeping rabbits out starts by removing the fence, digging a 2'-deep trench along the fence line, putting rabbit mesh along it on the bottom and on your side, filling it back in, rebuilding the fence and putting more mesh on that ... and then they come in through the gate.

They're delicious stir-fried in cream or casseroled, but they're missing an essential amino acid so you can't get all your protein that way no matter how many you eat.

I don't believe there's a plant on Earth that'll deter rabbits. There may be some scary thing in a rainforest somewhere that'd happily eat them, but I doubt it'd grow in England.

Maybe you want one of these handsome little athletes to move in with you. Unlike rabbits, they're native. Who'm I trying to kid? Of COURSE you want one. Who wouldn't want one of these?

http://i.imgur.com/oLjLq.jpg

Apparently pet stoats are very hard to acquire, though. Weasels are more suited to taming.

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 29/06/2015 at 18:22

Possibly it's the smell masking the scent of the lily. Possibly the larvae just fall off oiled plants. Possibly it's a "direct hit only" treatment and the oil actually sticks really well to the larvae and beetles. As insect breathe through skin pores, coating one in a viscous oil that doesn't dissolve oxygen well isn't going to do it any favours. I haven't looked up the details, yet, though. Hang on ...

Gardeners' World has a how-to page with this advice: "At the first sign of attack, spray plants with sunflower oil. Treatment is more effective on larvae than adults."

There's another tip, fairly logical when you know the things' life cycle: grow the lilies in pots. When the bulbs are dormant, repot them. All the dormant lily beetles are in the soil in the old pot. Bake it, burn it or microwave it or something like that, or just throw it in the fish pond. Bye-bye beetles.

I would like to identify a very tall plant I saw in minehead at may bank

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:42

Huge central spike, huge serrated leaves around the base?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Herkulesstaude_fg01.jpg/220px-Herkulesstaude_fg01.jpg

 If it was one of them, trust me when I say: "You do not want that."

You can take a sort of virtual bus ride thanks to Google Street View, but when I dropped in next to the car park extrance nearest Minehead Butlins (BlueSkies on Warren Rd) I saw palm trees and not a lot else tall and thin. Only three car parks visible on the map, and no tall spikes by any of them. Maybe it wasn't there when their car went past.

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:29

Dead *(^)&*%^(^*%^*(% website, if you'd give me a ^*()%*(^% preview button or let the ^(%(^*% edit button edit the ^*()%^*(% original £"%^£$&^ text rather than the re-formatted $%( that your $*^(%^%$%&$ auto-format spews out or just make the &^&^&^^&^&&^&&^ auto-format produce a ^$£$"$%£ decent )()*(*)()*)(&*()*()*() result, we wouldn't now have three attempts at the same post taking up space on this page and a rant about you following them.

Can a moderator please delete the first two attempts? Having replied again I new can't get at them to edit them. **** auto-format!

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:27

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

RHS site [link removed because auto-formatting can't handle it]:

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - [link removed becasue auto-formatting was cutting out a lot of text]

One variety of Lilium is currently advertised as lily beetle tolerant, Lilium ‘Defender Pink’

An RHS-HDC funded PhD research project indicated that in the spring female beetles are able to locate lilies by odour alone, and that the beetles preferentially move towards the odour of plants already infested with other beetles.

...

A Canadian lily site [link removed because auto-formatting is spazzing out all over this post today]:

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.

2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:26

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - [link removed becasue auto-formatting was cutting out a lot of text]

One variety of Lilium is currently advertised as lily beetle tolerant, Lilium ‘Defender Pink’

An RHS-HDC funded PhD research project indicated that in the spring female beetles are able to locate lilies by odour alone, and that the beetles preferentially move towards the odour of plants already infested with other beetles.

...

http://www.manitobalilies.ca/Life%20Cycle%20of%20the%20Red%20Lily%20Beetle.pdf

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.
2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:25

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/help-our-research/lily-beetle

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - see Link opens in new window

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.
2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

L

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:01

You can get rid of all three, lawn, moss and weeds right now, just by cutting it into squares with a spade and digging them out. Then you can replace it with whatever you like, but this isn't the best time of year for planting.

If you don't fancy the spadework, you could just hit everything with "something a bit like glyphosate" three weeks before planting time. That'll leave you with dead plants and their roots making digging harder, but they're not so tough. You'll save a fortune on compost and topsoil that way.

1 to 10 of 605

Discussions started by Charlie November

Uh-oh ...

This one doesn't look good. 
Replies: 4    Views: 209
Last Post: 27/06/2015 at 19:03

3-part hedge

This is what you get for neglecting it for 20 years! 
Replies: 8    Views: 365
Last Post: 04/04/2015 at 22:42

Most embarassing failure of the weekend

Replies: 10    Views: 737
Last Post: 09/04/2015 at 19:59

An octopus's garden in the shade

No octopodes, but lots of shade 
Replies: 8    Views: 580
Last Post: 01/05/2015 at 17:05

Holy glyphosate, Batman! What's that?

Huge thing with tiny white flowers and heart-shaped leaves 
Replies: 16    Views: 770
Last Post: 24/06/2014 at 16:52

Rose cuttings: timing

Replies: 8    Views: 679
Last Post: 22/03/2015 at 14:30

When is honey fungus not honey fungus?

At least I didn't spend anything. 
Replies: 18    Views: 2110
Last Post: 26/10/2013 at 16:46

Apple tree with white leaves

It seems to be healthy enough, if slow-growing 
Replies: 2    Views: 482
Last Post: 10/09/2013 at 18:34

Spurge?

Not a lily. Not an apple tree. 
Replies: 6    Views: 662
Last Post: 10/09/2013 at 22:29

Ooops!

Planning? Measuring? Me? 
Replies: 26    Views: 1599
Last Post: 01/04/2015 at 19:53

Leaving tulips in the ground

Can they be left in if the drainage is good? 
Replies: 14    Views: 3668
Last Post: 13/05/2013 at 08:09
11 threads returned