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Charlie November


Latest posts by Charlie November

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:27

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

RHS site [link removed because auto-formatting can't handle it]:

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - [link removed becasue auto-formatting was cutting out a lot of text]

One variety of Lilium is currently advertised as lily beetle tolerant, Lilium ‘Defender Pink’

An RHS-HDC funded PhD research project indicated that in the spring female beetles are able to locate lilies by odour alone, and that the beetles preferentially move towards the odour of plants already infested with other beetles.

...

A Canadian lily site [link removed because auto-formatting is spazzing out all over this post today]:

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.

2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:26

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - [link removed becasue auto-formatting was cutting out a lot of text]

One variety of Lilium is currently advertised as lily beetle tolerant, Lilium ‘Defender Pink’

An RHS-HDC funded PhD research project indicated that in the spring female beetles are able to locate lilies by odour alone, and that the beetles preferentially move towards the odour of plants already infested with other beetles.

...

http://www.manitobalilies.ca/Life%20Cycle%20of%20the%20Red%20Lily%20Beetle.pdf

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.
2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

Talkback: Lily beetle

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:25

Life cycle, species preference and clustering behaviour:

https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/help-our-research/lily-beetle

As part of RHS research, the susceptibility of six different lilies was assessed (one species and five hybrids). Results from the trial indicated that the species lily Lilium regale was less susceptible than the hybrids. The results from the trial have been published - see Link opens in new window

1. Over wintering adult beetles emerge in early spring from the surrounding soil to mate and lay 200 to 400 eggs on the underside of the leaves of the lily plant.
2. Eggs usually hatch in about 7-10 days. Emerging larvae will begin feeding on the underside of the leaves and then move to the top. This stage lasts for about 16-24 days. They will cover themselves with their own feces to discourage predators.
3. Larvae drop to the ground and pupate for about 20-25 days. Pupae cases are dark brown or black in color and very hard to find in the soil.
4. Emerging adults climb plants and feed until fall but do not normally mate or lay eggs until spring.
5. New adult beetles appear to swarm together and fly to seek out new locations during August to September.
6. Adults over winter in the surrounding soil or under plant debris. Some adults may survive over two seasons.

...

So if you gave away a clean bulb while it was totally dormant, rather than a spade-load of soil with the plant somewhere in the middle, you probably kept the beetles to yourself and rescued the lily from them.

I see a number of suggestions for dealing with these things, some involving making tea from tobacco (which means using nicotine itself rather than a neonicotinoid and will kill bees too), rhubarb leaves (which will kill all insects and any curious pet that licks it off the plant) or dog-strangling vine (Dear GOD!) or spraying the lilies with neem oil, sunflower oil or dilute vinegar. Another suggestion was to visit the local cafe, get their used coffee grounds and splat them around the base of each lily, because the beetles find lilies by smell and the coffee masks it.

 

L

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 14:01

You can get rid of all three, lawn, moss and weeds right now, just by cutting it into squares with a spade and digging them out. Then you can replace it with whatever you like, but this isn't the best time of year for planting.

If you don't fancy the spadework, you could just hit everything with "something a bit like glyphosate" three weeks before planting time. That'll leave you with dead plants and their roots making digging harder, but they're not so tough. You'll save a fortune on compost and topsoil that way.

Camera Corner

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 13:57

Hey, Lesley, it may be a weed but that's no reason to completely overlook all those redeeming features. Its flowers are pretty enough for a bridal bouquet, they smell heavenly and it's edible. Compared to knotweed or giant hogweed, the thing's so benign it's almost welcome. You'd never be forgiven for planting it on the allotment, but in an isolated raised bed surrounded by a drive or something like that it's a self-seeding, low-maintenance, edible, hardy perennial flower you could love.

 

I'd try to photograph some more sunsets and sunrises but around here, at this time of year, sunset starts about 23:30 and sunrise finishes about 01:50. Maybe a camera with an auto mode could take a picture every minute from 23:00 to 02:20, facing due north at Brimham Rocks or Tan Hill or something to make a nice animation of it, but I need my sleep.

Oh come on......

Posted: 28/06/2015 at 13:51

Verdun, to be entering a new dinosaur age, we'd have to see some new dinosaurs. I haven't seen the first example of any dinosaur species in or near my garden in MONTHS, I tell you.

 

No, really ...

 

https://xkcd.com/1211/

https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/birds_and_dinosaurs.png

 Last "first sighting" for me was a grey heron. Other than that, I've had the same dinosaurs as before: mallard, starling, blackbird, thrush, blue tit, great tit, coal tit, sparrow, dunnock, chaffinch ...

If we're bringing back pre-historic animals, I want opthalmosaurus.

Uh-oh ...

Posted: 27/06/2015 at 19:03

Well ... thank you. That's a huge relief. I was afraid it might be a couple of horsetails that arrived with the new planting there. Now to check out that honeysuckle-looking thing with the pink edges on its leaves ...

monkshood/devils helmet/aconitum

Posted: 27/06/2015 at 14:48

Yeah, knew about oxygen. It's fine below 1.2 atmospheres partial pressure, so you can dive on 20% oxygen (compressed air or helium-oxygen mixes) to about 42 metres in fresh water, 38 in sea water, before it suddenly knocks you out and kills you. Below 30m, it's best to switch to 85-15 HeO or even 90-10 HeO ... which is good down to 70m in sea water but doesn't contain enough oxygen to keep you alive near the surface, so you have to use the 80-20 to get down to 30m then switch to the 90-10 to get down to 70m then switch to 95-5 for the actual recovery of gold and platinum from the wreck at 110m, then switch back at the correct depths on the way up too, and you'd better take some very big tanks down with you because at 110m down you're at 12 atmospheres pressure, so you get through your stored gas at 240 l/min and even a 15l tank at 200 atmospheres will only last you 12.5 minutes.

Yes, platinum bars. Why else would you go that far down?

Nitrogen's toxic too. Nitrogen narcosis, aka rapture of the deep, gets divers a bit "drunk" even at 25m. Then if you stayed down there you've got to make decompression stops on the way back up, too, or you get the bends.

Oh come on......

Posted: 27/06/2015 at 14:25

WillDB, you're with the 10,853 not the 2, then?

Uh-oh ...

Posted: 27/06/2015 at 14:19

What is this thing that has appeared this year?

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/83067.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/83068.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/83069.jpg?width=270&height=350&mode=max

 I pulled one out from next to the house, and found another two at next door's entrance, 3m from the house. Tufty-looking things ... kind of like ... the rearmost hairs of a zebra?

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11 threads returned