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Charlie November


Latest posts by Charlie November

Holy glyphosate, Batman! What's that?

Posted: 25/05/2014 at 20:30

Thanks for the replies.

Doesn't look like either of my jasmines, beesianum or nudiflorum.

Close on the Honesty, but the flowers are too small and distributed differently.

Looks like it's Jack By The Hedge. Hrm. It's welcome in my garden, then, but why does it have to take root in the middle of the flower bed where it's got a foot depth of compost and no competition? Oh, yeah, that's why, isn't it? For the record, it seeds like crazy too. Turns out I've got hundreds of younger plants as well as the mature one(s) shown there. Well, it can have some space and breed butterflies for me, and maybe I'll try adding it to a meal some time. Thanks Dove!

Holy glyphosate, Batman! What's that?

Posted: 25/05/2014 at 19:54

I go on one little walking holiday and I get invaded ...

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/46964.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 It's about waist-high on me, which is fairly large.

My camera chose to focus on the far side of the flower spike, not the near side.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/46965.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 Those flowers are only a few millimetres across.

Anyone know what this is, and whether I should be thrilled or just get rid of it, please?

Transport needed for flooded gardens

Posted: 07/05/2014 at 22:50

Got a few seed heads I could collect ... on the hyacinths. So, hyacinths that may eventually produce flowers of unknown colour some time around April 2022?

Ooops!

Posted: 07/05/2014 at 16:57

4 adult beetles and around 15 eggs destroyed.

Allium time!

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/45076.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/45078.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/45079.jpg?width=268&height=350&mode=max

 

 

Expensive gardening mistake - help needed

Posted: 03/05/2014 at 13:32
hartleyhare wrote (see)

Hi Everyone,

However, the builders dumped a load of soil and rubble on it from making a new patio and in my madness I decided to try and turn it into a sort of raised bed. I laid more soil - 4 tons of it in fact - on top of the builders mess and then shaped it so that there was a bank of earth in the middle and a flatish bit around the outside. I had planned to put in wooden borders where it sloped away ( to stop the gravel slipping down ) and then after planting up with wildlife friendly plants I was going to cover it all with gravel and  rocks and driftwood, etc. Its difficult to describe it all, pictures would be far better, but I don't know how to add them here.

Well, it sounds like a s***-heap ... but the pictures don't look so bad. I thought you had a big round heap in the middle of a square lawn.

There's a steep earth bank by the canal near here that's been slowly creeping downhill for years. The towpath's getting slightly narrower every year, but it's a very slow process. You should be alright with ground cover stabilising it, but if it flows down against that wall on the right side you'll get damp issues there. You could just shovel it all back to the top in five years' time, I suppose.

Looking at the nice view, I can believe you when you say digging beyond a certain depth is hard. I've tried digging in the Dales and been tampted to put the spade away and make some dynamite. If you don't want to go to the trouble (and rubble) of making holes in bedrock, there is still a way to concrete in a post. You need to build forms for the concrete first, out of cheap MDF board and 2"x2" pine. Put all the pine and screws on the outside so the inside's nice and smooth, sit the thing on bare bedrock, shave bits off the underside until it sits level, stand the post in the middle of it, pour in the wet concrete mix, make sure the post's upright and leave it to set. Once it's done you can dismantle the form and use it for the next one or you can do them all at once, toss the MDF in the bin and use the pine for kindling.

A fence built this way won't have the stability to stop horses or stay upright in a wind with those lap panels on it (I swear they're modelled on windmill sails) but if you're only putting in 2' posts and the bottom 9" of each are in the concrete you'll have some pretty stable things.

Then you put rails across the posts on the uphill side so the weight of the soil is pushing wood against wood, not pulling all your nails out. Then you can put your chemical-soaked rot-resistant retaining wall on the uphill side of the rails. Make sure there's soil (or the builders' waste material from under your mound) packed in downhill of the fence bases to stop them sledging away.

The fence will slowly get toppled by slumping soil, but it'll be something your grandchildren have to fix one day.

...

Just kidding about the dynamite. Too risky. I'd use TNT.

Expensive gardening mistake - help needed

Posted: 03/05/2014 at 13:30
hartleyhare wrote (see)

Hi Everyone,

Firstly this looks like a great place to learn about gardening and gets lots of help and advice  I have to say that I am not much of a gardener, a few pots are about my limit. I like the idea of it but the reality tends to be all together something different - lol!

Anyways, I need some advice please about what to do to rectify a problem. I have a piece of ground that backs onto the driveway. There was a flat bit that sloped away from the drive. It was turfed. However, the builders dumped a load of soil and rubble on it from making a new patio and in my madness I decided to try and turn it into a sort of raised bed. I laid more soil - 4 tons of it in fact - on top of the builders mess and then shaped it so that there was a bank of earth in the middle and a flatish bit around the outside. I had planned to put in wooden borders where it sloped away ( to stop the gravel slipping down ) and then after planting up with wildlife friendly plants I was going to cover it all with gravel and  rocks and driftwood, etc. The problem I have now is that the wooden borders  cannot be knocked into the soil as its just loose, so nothing to actually hold them in place. The 4 extra tons I added has made it too deep to reach the solid earth underneath and when you do get to the solid earth its actually hard packed gravel and rock.. And because the soil is just loose it is starting to slip down the slope when it rains. Its difficult to describe it all, pictures would be far better, but I don't know how to add them here.

So if anyone can understand my slightly incoherent ramblings and offer some advice I would be most grateful  Ijust  need a way to secure the wooden borders at the top of the slope.

 

Well, it sounds like a s***-heap ... but the pictures don't look so bad. I thought you had a big round heap in the middle of a square lawn.

There's a steep earth bank by the canal near here that's been slowly creeping downhill for years. The towpath's getting slightly narrower every year, but it's a very slow process. You should be alright with ground cover stabilising it, but if it flows down against that wall on the right side you'll get damp issues there. You could just shovel it all back to the top in five years' time, I suppose.

Looking at the nice view, I can believe you when you say digging beyond a certain depth is hard. I've tried digging in the Dales and been tampted to put the spade away and make some dynamite. If you don't want to go to the trouble (and rubble) of making holes in bedrock, there is still a way to concrete in a post. You need to build forms for the concrete first, out of cheap MDF board and 2"x2" pine. Put all the pine and screws on the outside so the inside's nice and smooth, sit the thing on bare bedrock, shave bits off the underside until it sits level, stand the post in the middle of it, pour in the wet concrete mix, make sure the post's upright and leave it to set. Once it's done you can dismantle the form and use it for the next one or you can do them all at once, toss the MDF in the bin and use the pine for kindling.

A fence built this way won't have the stability to stop horses or stay upright in a wind with those lap panels on it (I swear they're modelled on windmill sails) but if you're only putting in 2' posts and the bottom 9" of each are in the concrete you'll have some pretty stable things.

Then you put rails across the posts on the uphill side so the weight of the soil is pushing wood against

Removing Horsetail

Posted: 27/04/2014 at 11:19
Hostafan1 wrote (see)

until about 4 days ago, even after 30 years in professional horticulture , I'd never heard of " horsetails" apart from the obvious equine type. Does anyone smell a rat?

 

It's political correctness gone mad!

Transport needed for flooded gardens

Posted: 26/04/2014 at 12:24

I think I'm a way off the network we're drawing, so far, but I can link Scotch Corner to Wetherby Services, York truck stop or the Settle Falconry Centre if any of those are useful connection points.

Not a right lot here I could offer right now. Two pink roses are NOT looking happy. I've got a honeysuckle growing from a cutting in the magic area between compost heap and fence and a large number of small elder trees, but that's about it.

Removing Horsetail

Posted: 26/04/2014 at 12:11

I haven't had to fight this one (yet) but from what I've heard it's wearing a layer of glass so your glyphosate will run right off it. If you have the time to invest in the job though, you can make glyphosate way more effective.

First catch your weed. Shouldn't be hard, as they don't run all that fast. Get your knife out and shave the sides of it, exposing the juicy insides of the stem. Wrap it in kitchen roll or toilet paper. Soak that in glyphosate. It won't run off that surface.

If it's in between plants you don't want to kill, a short length of 2" plastic downpipe (Homebase sells this stuff in long lengths pretty cheaply, for greenhouses and the like) will go over the target plant as a splash-preventer. You can leave it there if it's a windy day and plants are blowing against each other.

Discussions started by Charlie November

Holy glyphosate, Batman! What's that?

Huge thing with tiny white flowers and heart-shaped leaves 
Replies: 16    Views: 589
Last Post: 24/06/2014 at 16:52

Rose cuttings: timing

Replies: 7    Views: 385
Last Post: 31/03/2014 at 17:26

When is honey fungus not honey fungus?

At least I didn't spend anything. 
Replies: 18    Views: 1583
Last Post: 26/10/2013 at 16:46

Apple tree with white leaves

It seems to be healthy enough, if slow-growing 
Replies: 2    Views: 337
Last Post: 10/09/2013 at 18:34

Spurge?

Not a lily. Not an apple tree. 
Replies: 6    Views: 504
Last Post: 10/09/2013 at 22:29

Ooops!

Planning? Measuring? Me? 
Replies: 17    Views: 896
Last Post: 07/05/2014 at 16:57

Leaving tulips in the ground

Can they be left in if the drainage is good? 
Replies: 14    Views: 2163
Last Post: 13/05/2013 at 08:09
7 threads returned