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Chris 11


Latest posts by Chris 11

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Courgettes

Posted: 28/02/2015 at 14:39

This is a common experience, especially early season.

If you put courgettes in the search box, I'm sure there will be past threads where this has been discussed.

Talkback: How to grow sunflowers from seed

Posted: 28/02/2015 at 14:35

I've been growing them for many years. They're great for pollinating insects as well as birds and squirrels.

Free Seeds

Posted: 28/02/2015 at 14:27

Thanks Mel, that's a generous offer. I'd be happy to have all the tomato seeds, they sound interesting varieties.

If you want to split them between different people, I'd like the Urbicany/Urbikany, they look like a good option for outdoors.

tomato seed germination

Posted: 25/02/2015 at 12:59

In a heated propagator or very warm windowsill or cupboard, could be as little as 3 days, although usually it's 5-10 days.

In cool conditions they can fail to germinate and rot, so I agree with Gardenmaiden about starting again after two weeks.

Recommendations for coping with large numbers of aphids

Posted: 30/01/2015 at 09:12

Biggest problem for me in the greenhouse has been aphids, they like chilli plants, and I've found this very helpful:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/problems/flowers/aphids/385.htm

'Natural predators, such as birds, earwigs, ladybirds, lacewings, hoverflies, ground beetles, spiders and parasitic wasps are a gardener's best allies.'

I like the idea of growing more plants to naturally attract aphid predators. I always grow sunflowers, and they feed ladybirds as well as birds and squirrels.

And maybe look at buying some ladybirds and/or ladybird larvae to make a difference more quickly.

http://www.greengardener.co.uk/product.asp?id_pc=34&cat=75

 

Planting early

Posted: 29/01/2015 at 14:06

I'm with Grant and Treehugger on this.

Growing chillis seems to be one of those things that can become a healthy obsession, so it's natural to be itching to get started already.

Start too early, and it's the double whammy of not enough heat to germinate, then not enough light as well as heat to help them thrive. But these can be overcome with heated propagators, bright windowsills, extra artificial lighting etc, although you might still end up with results that are caught up by seeds planted much later.

Chillis are always the first thing I grow each year. They really do benefit from the longest possible growing season. Later plantings don't always catch up as easily as you find with tomatoes, which I agree are best left later, till at least mid-Feb if you have a HP, and early March if you don't.

I've started chillies even earlier than Grant, also in a heated propagator. They're doing fine, around an inch high and with true leaves already growing. They need the heat for germination, but will tolerate more cold once they're seedlings. At that point enough light is more important in preventing legginess.

I have them on the sunniest windowsill, then move them in to the kitchen, the warmest and brightest room, for the evening, then back to the sunniest windowsill first thing the next morning.

anyone started growing their chili peppers yet?

Posted: 26/01/2015 at 15:35

I've started a few in a heated propagator.

Once germinated, they spend the day on a sunny windowsill.

 

Sowing Seeds in January

Posted: 27/12/2014 at 10:30

Good advice from several people already.

Growing chillis seems to be one of those things that can become a healthy obsession, so it's natural to be itching to get started.

Too early, and it's the double whammy of not enough heat to germinate, then not enough light as well as heat to help them thrive. These can be overcome with heated propagators, bright windowsills, extra artificial lighting etc, but you might still end up with results that are caught up by seeds planted much later.

Chillis are always the first thing I grow each year. They really do benefit from the longest possible growing season, and later plantings don't always catch up as easily as you find with tomatoes.

 

 

poisonous courgettes

Posted: 04/12/2014 at 19:22

The bitter taste of some fruit is caused by an over-production of plant defence chemicals called ‘cucurbitacins’. This is mainly a problem in courgettes and summer squash and is caused primarily by a mutation within the plant. The problem is more likely when plants are grown from saved seeds, where inadvertent cross-pollination may have occurred.

Affected fruit should not be eaten as it causes stomach upsets and affected plants should be removed.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=676

'Mazina's chilli'

Posted: 06/11/2014 at 19:08

Thanks Edd, I agree something like that is the most likely explanation.

1 to 10 of 31

Discussions started by Chris 11

'Mazina's chilli'

Anyone heard of it? 
Replies: 3    Views: 346
Last Post: 06/11/2014 at 19:08
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