chrissieB


Latest posts by chrissieB

Lawn in a bad way! Help!

Posted: 09/07/2017 at 09:17

If the all in one includes moss killer, I suspect that the "burned" bits are simply patches where the moss has been killed. Your garden looks quite shady so there's was probably quite a lot of moss?


I would rake out the dead moss and aerate it (spike with a fork). Any bald patches can be reseeded but make use you choose a blend suitable for your garden - you can buy mixes for shade/dry areas etc. It will be challenging to get much more width given the competition/shad from the hedges and tress but choosing the right seed mix should help a lot.

Birds

Posted: 09/07/2017 at 08:30

We never had to net the reasoebrries on our allotment, yet pigeons would eat everything else. no idea why - we just assumed that for some reason they didn't like them as much as other stuff available and it was a huge site so lots of choice.


Are yours in your garden, josusa ?

Last edited: 09 July 2017 08:30:39

Container screen planting and wildlife

Posted: 08/07/2017 at 15:36

Butpy the biggest containers you can afford for your shrubs, then you can have a greater choice and they will be happier as well. For wildlife you usually want to variety of flowering times and good seed heads and/or berries. Not sure what to suggest that I know will be happy in containers but RSPB list may help - link below


https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/a-z-of-a-wildlife-garden/plants.aspx


English Ivy is very good for wildlife especially as it matures and flowers.


Just thought maybe you could also build some raised beds - that may be a cheaper way of getting more planting space? 

Any idea what this is?

Posted: 08/07/2017 at 15:28

If you crush a black currant leaf it will smell of blackcurrants - a sharp leafy version but quite definite

Hot Composting

Posted: 06/07/2017 at 06:24

Was it an article about hot composting bins? They sound very good, my only question would be how easy it is to generate enough material. I had a quick look into one and you have I keep them very well 'fed' but must admit I didn't read into it in detail.

Rabbit damage

Posted: 06/07/2017 at 06:16

You may have to experiment - we had rabbits when our kids were little. All I can say is they never read the lists of what they were supposed to like or not like.


I don't remember having much succes with any bedding plants and it been rather haphazard, sometimes they would eat something straightaway and sometimes they would wait just long enough for you to think you had found something they didn't like. The other problem with bedding is that it doesn't tend to regrow if they have a good nibble and then decide they won't come back for more.


I do seem to remember that they didn't like foliage with a strong scent such as lavenders, sun rose etc 

Sebastian Rose

Posted: 06/07/2017 at 06:04

http://www.lubera.co.uk/plants/roses/modern-roses/hybrid-teas/rose-sebastian-kneipp-in-a-large-container


No idea if this nursery is any good - was on first oage of google search so there may be others

Pond edging

Posted: 05/07/2017 at 08:47

Our pond is surrounded by lawn along three sides. We have hidden the edges of the liner by tucking them under the turf by about 15-20 cms. We were quite slow putting the grass edges back, whilst we decided what we wanted to do,so the grass had gone brown and largely died but it has recovered and despite the hot weather the grass has pretty much re- grown back to the pond edge - this is without any extra watering and we have had very dry weather. Yes the liner doesn't drain as it's waterproof but it's pretty much flat so doesnt pool water either. The turfs on top were about 4cm thick so deeper than a standard (bought) piece of turf.


i don't see why you would get muddy run-off from a lawn (even if sloped)? We will have to clip the edges around the pond for a neat lawn edge and we do get some grass clippings falling into the water when we mow - but these could easily be scooped out with a net if they bothered you.

Why are my Conifers dying from the bottom up

Posted: 04/07/2017 at 08:38

 Hard to say without knowing what sort it is or if there is anything physically wrong with it. It probably doesn't need saving - most conifers allowed to grow naturally will develop a bare trunk at the base.


If it's one usually used as hedging then as said in the thread they need to be trimmed and appropriately from day one to maintain any growth down to ground or near ground level. Once a trunk has formed than it won't regrow any leaf.

Laurel hedge will it ever stop

Posted: 04/07/2017 at 08:28

HUGE.


We have one that is as almost as tall as our cottage with a canopy about 5m/16ft across. It was here when we moved in last year and we have kept it as it helps with privacy and we have been able to expose its trunk which is a great shape so it looks quite architectural - think tree rather than shrub/hedge


They are monsters to be honest, we had the canopy trimmed and shaped to the 5m from about 6 or so this time last year and I reckon it's put half of that back on this year. We also have some along our boundary - never shaped or close enough to be a hedge unfortunately and are about to give them another bout of major surgery. I suspect they are self seeded from the big tree and most are around 4m tall


They seem to put most of their growth on between spring and about now - from our limited 15 months experience - as we don't remember they put much if any on last summer after been trimmed in the July just started to go mad again this year.


If left untrimmed you do get nice flowers and ours are cherry laurels so we also get cherry shaped fruits which mature from yellow-green to red to black but watch out for babies seeding in your borders. They also drop leaves most of the year and sometimes at an incredible rate especially this time of year - collected a trug full yesterday from the laurel tree - am not usually fussed about leaves on borders but there are huge things (longer than my hand) so visually smother small plants and they take forever to break down.


Having said all that, I really like my tree as he is quite different. And they are a strong glossy green so the shrub like ones along the boundary are a good evergreen backdrop to other planting, But would happily get rid of those along the boundary if they weren't giving us the privacy 

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