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Dave Morgan


Latest posts by Dave Morgan

Whitefly

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 10:32

Honeysuckle is a woodland plant so it needs moisture and shade at the roots. Mulch it heavily and keep the soil moist. In spring you can prune it down quite hard, you'll get plenty of new growth if you keep up the regime of moisture food and shade. It'll be less prone to black spot and powdery mildew as well.

Philadelphus

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 10:28

Nibbling will be snails, not a lot you can do, I'd feed it well and mulch it heavily and keep the soil moist over the summer. The new growth will shoot away and should do better next year. Some shrubs just take time to settle down especially if they've had a poor start so some patience and tlc is all that's required.

time to take cuttings

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 00:21

Too hot Ritchard and yes cooler is better than the oven in the greenhouse.

Whitefly

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 00:13

Is it dry at the roots rosemummy?

One last plant ID thread!

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 00:10

Could be one of the leucanthemums though which one is hard to tell without the flower. 

Beginner gardener's query

Posted: 10/07/2014 at 00:05

Container gardening is different to planting in beds raised or otherwise. Many gardeners plant pots to come at different times of the year coordinating foliage with bulbs or early flowering half hardy annuals with bulbs which are then emptied and replanted for the summer with summer flowering annuals or perennials. With beds you have the opportunity to mix up all sorts, with bulbs underneath perennials which hide the dying foliage of the spring bulbs. They will nearly always find their way through plants planted above them, unless they are densely rooted perennials. So choose your perennials carefully.

Daffodils and crocus are easy bulbs which don't mind being planted over, tulips unless planted deeply usually require lifting after the foliage dies down, so are sometimes planted in trays and lifted and stored.

The key I find is plenty of organic manure or compost homemade or bought in and then spread on beds during the year.

There are a host of books on container gardening and you will get suggestions from others on here as to their personal favourites'.

Perceived wisdom's can be ignored or taken on board, but containers do limit your choices as food and water need to be added to get the best results.

I'm happy for you that you now have the bug and can only say the knowledge you will get from this forum is worth a thousand books. No question is silly, the only question which is is the one you don't ask.

When best to remove a leylandii hedge?

Posted: 09/07/2014 at 23:35

Quite a few birds nest in leyllandi, including blackbirds and the goldcrest. 

Why does my garden look raggedy?

Posted: 08/07/2014 at 19:40

Have you chosen perennials which flower in just may and june, or ones that flower at different times?

Filling in lawn centre-piece

Posted: 08/07/2014 at 19:37

Filling in any any depression in a lawn is always difficult. I find watering the newly filled hole repeatedly (four or five times over a 2 week period) settles the soil to about the level you'll require, even then be prepared for more settlement. You may have to top dress several times in order to get it right. Last winter has caused settlement problems for some of my customers. I'm afraid it will be a case of patience. If it's only a foot or so deep, I'd use just topsoil, a rubble base will cause more problems than it's worth as the soil will take ages to work its way between the rubble, and using rubble can cause compaction and drainage problems. Sorry paull2, patience will be the key.

When best to remove a leylandii hedge?

Posted: 08/07/2014 at 19:25

Farmers aren't allowed to cut hedges till the end of July, by law as disturbing nesting birds of any sort is a criminal offence. End of July is the best time as few if any nests will be occupied by then.

Discussions started by Dave Morgan

Best Thornproof Gloves

Replies: 3    Views: 178
Last Post: 26/05/2014 at 23:10

Clematis for a dry bank

Replies: 6    Views: 280
Last Post: 09/04/2014 at 15:20

Peach for fan traing

Replies: 3    Views: 177
Last Post: 13/02/2014 at 21:19

Colder weather is coming!

Replies: 17    Views: 1405
Last Post: 21/01/2014 at 17:54

Invasive roots from a neighbours garden

Can I remove invasive roots from my garden, 
Replies: 8    Views: 464
Last Post: 12/10/2013 at 00:56

semi-rigid-plastic-sheeting

Hold in invasive roots 
Replies: 5    Views: 715
Last Post: 08/03/2014 at 20:33
6 threads returned