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Dave Shah


Latest posts by Dave Shah

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Plants being eaten!

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 12:41

it sounds like slug damage to me they are active during the night..i'm not sure on your stance but if you want just sprinkle some slug pellets and see if any slugs are killed then that will give you the answer.

.there are numerous organic methods for slug control as well as pellets

.red lilly beetles will eat your lillies pick them off and squash them as you patrol during the day.

if you decide to use  pellets on a regular basis i would suggest you start now as tahe winter has been so mild and the slugs are still active.you can also clear up any debris to stop them sheltering eg leaves,boards,old stones.plastic. 

light fork or hoe you soil on a regular basis so birds can get at slug eggs. 

Grape hyacinths

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 12:29

you could try digging out the soil and sieving it back the little bulbs should then be easy to find and throw  out. do  a small area and then move on.

also stop the plants seeding so deadhead them after flowering.overtime you will suceed.

if you still want to grow them, grow them as annuals in pots.

it's probably best to try the organic ways before the chemical.

Vine Weevil

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 12:20

hi vine weevils are nocturnal so when it warms up get out with your torch and pick the adults off your plants this works and of course they will not be able to lay eggs.also as you are weeding and turnning the soil l keep a a look out for the larve.i found some the other day .good garden hygiene will also help.i've used pravado ultimate bug kill in the past drench the plants being attack in the evening pick the weevils up in the morning you'll need to sqash them as mine were still climbing up the jar the following after noon.vasaline round pots may also act as a barrier.

Reclaiming a very over run garden

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 12:10

sounds like it's coming together happy planting

Plotting where the sun is going to shine

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 12:05

you could draw an outline plan of your space.then plot on the plan acompass point.as the sun goes east to west it should give you an idea of what you've got.as you say the garage will cast some shade but if your garden is south facing and the garage is at one side this will be either in the morning eastern side or in the evening western side.

one good idea is when you've time and a sunny day spend the day in the garden and see where the sun falls throughout the day i've done this and it's amazing how what you think is a shady spoy gets plenty of sunlight.

with regard to your cuttings make a list of the conditions they  need as some prefer shade and some like full sunthen as you create your garden you can place them to suit.i'm sure all will be come clear.

also why not have a look at your neighbours gardens and you'll see how they have designed their gardens. 

Tips on types of soil etc for the base of a raised flower bed

Posted: 29/01/2012 at 11:54

.if have  some dimensions of your bed and a list of possible plants you wish to grow it;s easier to give an answer.

for example if you are growing annuals with shallow roots and the bed is 18 inches high you can put crocks in the bottom to fill it out.but if you want to grow potatoes or parsnips you will need deep good quality soil.

Reclaiming a very over run garden

Posted: 10/01/2012 at 11:01

slowly slowly is the best way start with the bits you will get most fun out of, the terraced flower gardens would be my choice.

get yourself a long cane place it a foot from the borders edge either vertical or horizontal and work in this area until it's tidy.

alternately get yourself a good tarpaulin and actually dig out the soil onto the tarp sort through the soil pulling out all the weeds and old roots you'll be amazed how little you need to weed in the future.as you put the soil back add organic material.

if you have the funds get help to do the hedges and rhodos make sure all the waste will be taken away.  

Jubilee Summer Planting

Posted: 16/12/2011 at 15:55

a nice blue would be anchusa 'angel eyes' these could take over when the forget me nots have past their best.another to try are Cynoglossom(chinese forget me nots)these will also flower into autumn.i doubt a packet of seeds would be more than a few pounds and maybe one of the local gardeners could grow them for you.you could ask your local gardening club for help.

Starting from scratch

Posted: 16/12/2011 at 15:42

you could start by drawing a plan of your plot.then think about what you might like to have in say five years time.mark on the plan compass points and work out the prevailing wind.then you'll know which areas are sheltered and sunny spots.

then decide what to tackle.maybe you can phase it over a few years start working round the house where you will probably get most enjoyment.

before you cut the bushes down give them a season perhaps they are useful as a windbreak or perhaps they may add to your garden in terms of blossom.sometimes it's best to see what you've got before getting the loppers out.

it might be a good idea to think about raised beds.they don't have to be expensive infact i guess there are plenty of stones where you are. build them into bed  four foot wide easy reach without treadin on the soil. and as long as you want and perhaps a local farmer has some old manure you can have to help fill them.

if you want to plant bulbs try low growing ones ie mini daffs not full size ones.

i'm sure you will suceed my top tip is see what your neighbours have got.if they can grow it then you can. good luck. 

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