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David K

Latest posts by David K


Posted: 12/02/2015 at 20:18

A little while ago I asked the question of you lovelies, 'why would anyone buy grated cheese or bagged salad leaves from a supermarket'.

Now, I would ask why on earth would anyone watch Keith Lemon on TV? 

Qualcast 700W Electric Rotovator

Posted: 12/02/2015 at 08:57

I agree with both and with the benefit of hindsight I probably wouldn't have bought mine.

With its narrow blade width of around 9 inches it is quite useful for weeding/hoeing  between rows and is also very lightweight....having said that, I would rather have the (almost) £400 purchase cost.

Nothing compares with peace & tranquillity when using my trusty old spade & fork.  

Qualcast 700W Electric Rotovator

Posted: 11/02/2015 at 22:10

I wouldn't call it 'hard work'. but they aren't suitable for ground that hasn't already been worked. I use mine mainly for keeping weeds down between rows....even then it leaps around a lot.

Qualcast 700W Electric Rotovator

Posted: 11/02/2015 at 22:00

Given the loose stones flying around, I think I would be wearing some eye protection.....eyesight is very precious & can be lost in a trice.

Btw, I have a Mantis tiller with a Honda 4 stroke engine. 

Camera Corner

Posted: 11/02/2015 at 19:07

 More snowdrops, for those who like them.

Camera Corner

Posted: 11/02/2015 at 18:50

"Been on your belly again DAVID. "

I'm wondering if you take yours lying down, Rb.

Btw, I'm not a 'Forker'.


Camera Corner

Posted: 10/02/2015 at 19:24

 Mine's the biggest!  

Camera Corner

Posted: 10/02/2015 at 09:23

There you go....getting me mixed up with someone of intelligence & sophistication.

Music in the Garden

Posted: 09/02/2015 at 20:53

I'm sure anyone lucky enough to have seen the Victorian Kitchen Garden series on BBC2 in the 1980s, will love this:

sweetpea idea

Posted: 09/02/2015 at 20:33

The Victorians with their endless source of labour & insatiable thirst for display, used to grow clematis horizontally in circular beds.

This was achieved by laying suitable sticks within a circular border after careful soil preparation, the plants were then planted between these sticks and carefully trained. 

A demonstration is available on the 'Victorian Flower Garden' DVD, with head gardener Harry Dodson.

I have reservations about this being successful with sweet peas.  

Discussions started by David K

Sweet Pea Know How

Replies: 10    Views: 278
Last Post: 02/10/2015 at 16:58

How much....

Replies: 60    Views: 1281
Last Post: 29/08/2015 at 22:29

Any Apple Experts?

Replies: 9    Views: 355
Last Post: 08/08/2015 at 21:12

Chester Visit

Replies: 4    Views: 259
Last Post: 14/07/2015 at 21:31

The day for misbehavin....

Replies: 5    Views: 418
Last Post: 16/04/2015 at 20:53

Top Tom Tip

Replies: 11    Views: 626
Last Post: 30/03/2015 at 18:07

Britain's National Bird

Replies: 28    Views: 1000
Last Post: 13/06/2015 at 11:55

I D please?

Replies: 2    Views: 333
Last Post: 08/03/2015 at 10:30

Gardening challenges for 2015

Replies: 52    Views: 2531
Last Post: 28/02/2015 at 12:42

RIP Joe Cocker...

Replies: 8    Views: 1311
Last Post: 26/12/2014 at 10:56

Hidden Villages

Replies: 28    Views: 978
Last Post: 27/11/2014 at 12:01

RIP Dowager Duchess of Devonshire

Replies: 12    Views: 703
Last Post: 09/10/2014 at 08:20

Growing Sweet Peas 2014/2015

Replies: 526    Views: 23613
Last Post: 01/10/2015 at 12:14

It's all quite shameful...

Replies: 18    Views: 639
Last Post: 21/09/2014 at 13:43

Strictly 2014

Replies: 453    Views: 18753
Last Post: 21/12/2014 at 22:47
1 to 15 of 56 threads