London (change)
Today 19°C / 12°C
Tomorrow 17°C / 10°C

DorsetUK


Latest posts by DorsetUK

1 to 10 of 404

Twayblades

Posted: Today at 13:28

Most of it does get done late in the year but there's lots of clearing up and it's individuals doing that when they can.  I think they've stopped anyway now but the damage is done for this year and I don't think the Twayblades will recover enough to flower. When the village first acquired the wood there was just me and occasionally one or two others for the first 5 years, then a committee was formed to combine the Millennium Green, the Village Hall grounds and the wood which all run consecutively along the river. So I opted out, very few appeared to be aware of what I had been doing anyway.

I rather lost any confidence in Wildlife Trusts when I observed a bunch of primary school pupils planting bluebells in another of the local woods.  Poor tatty looking bunches held in hot little hands, a hasty scraping of the ground, bluebells laid down and another hasty scraping to cover them.  All supervised by the Wildlife Trust rangers.  That was bad enough but I also took one of the rangers a little further along the path to where there was a magnificent display of Red Elf fungus. Was she interested? She didn't even pretend to be. And no, not a single bluebell survived that traumatic experience

Twayblades

Posted: Today at 12:50

There's a small clump of Twayblades in one of the woods here.  They've been there many years but they are right on the edge of a main path.  That wasn't a problem for a long time as they're not really what you could call 'stand out and shout' plants.  However the local committee have been thinning out trees and enthusiastic unwanted undergrowth and using a small tractor and trailer to remove the consequent piles. That travels along this path and has flattened the emerging  orchids. It would be difficult to drive along without running over them especially as you can't actually see them unless you know exactly where they are. Everything except the narrow path is on a hillside so driving the opposite side would risk tipping the tractor over.  Question is will they move successfully? A metre or so would do

Are my common Laurels dead?

Posted: Today at 11:17

At that price you wuz definitely robbed, added to the daft instructions later, you've been very badly treated all round.  Don't despair though, this forum does know what it's talking about so hang on in there and cross your fingers.

ps Laurel grows like a weed round here, originally planted as part of a large estate it now forms huge trees in places along with Juniper

My New Garden Friend....sorry I had to come and show off

Posted: Today at 10:18

We're lucky here in the Dorset countryside.  Trees abound in spinneys, plantations and larger woods. We have Barn, Tawny and Little owls, sometimes the Tawnies are the only sound you can hear at night where I live.  We have the river running through the village which lies in a steep sided valley with a wide flood plain. We have kingfishers, herons (grey and egret), swans nesting, mallards (some of which head for private gardens with pools to hatch their babes and which then have to be escorted across the road between them and the river) and sometimes cormorants.  We have voles, occasionally salmon, but many smaller species of fish so the river birds do very well. I have frogs, toads, field mice and sometimes hedgehogs in my tiny patch. That is partly because much of the ground around is more or else left to its own devices.  I know people who live in suburban/town areas who think the countryside is boring.  Poor things, they don't know what they're missing

Slow coach hardy geraniums

Posted: Today at 08:49

Losing the plot? I  mislaid my camera for 10 days.  As I use it constantly it was a bit of a worry.  Found it eventually when I wasn't looking for it.  I got into the car and it was about 6 inches from my left hand and had been all the time.  Admittedly it was in a black case  on a black surface and it wasn't the sort of spot I would normally put anything let alone a camera.  I'm usually in and out of my car several times a day and although I frequently mislay things I looked at the camera for a long time before I finally  realised I wasn't just hopefully seeing things

My New Garden Friend....sorry I had to come and show off

Posted: Yesterday at 23:47

My daughter and her husband are holidaying in the Outer Hebrides.  It has been a traumatic 18 months for them as Iain was at death's door early last year and even when there was a hope he would survive we didn't know exactly whether he would ever be whole again.  They are having a wonderful time just wandering the islands but the excitement mounted when they found an eagle watching post.  They watched her do the 'housekeeping' and then feed the chick and, as Helen said, it was a special 'with knobs on' experience to add to their day.  My most delightful moment bird watching was a woodpecker, same as yours OL, feeding alongside a Goldfinch. The first time you see something as spectacular as the Greater Spotted Woodpecker in your garden, is always a highlight.  Hope he returns for you

Sparrows Stripping Chard

Posted: 17/05/2015 at 18:07

Lots of sparrows here, they're on the feeders every day.  They nest under the eaves of the houses behind us.  Blackbirds abound as do Goldfinches, Long-tail Tits appear at intervals, Chaffinch, Robin, Wren, Dunnock, Blue and Great Tit, Woodpecker, Collared Doves and suddenly Jackdaws.  Wagtails and House Martins will soon appear, the first to patrol the car park and roofs, the other to nest under our eaves.  I have ti ter myself away at times or I'd get nothing productive done

Oh no.....not again...

Posted: 16/05/2015 at 11:45

It will take me a long time to get used to his absence but I will always think of him with laughter behind the tears. He was as serious about his gardening as he was about his farming. He planted trees for future generations and his asparagus bed was a sight to behold. He started literally from scratch with pennies saved from jobs on neighbouring farms from an early age, read everything he could lay hands on, learned from experience and put every scrap of knowledge to good use.  A self-made man who trampled nobody on his way to the top.   The sheer physical work of farming without much of the modern machinery bound us together in the first place as well as careful husbandry of the animals we tended.  There were many stories of his kindness on the day, it  won't be just me who will miss him.

Peat free compost

Posted: 16/05/2015 at 08:51

The local Farm store (used to be called Scats) sells the Jack's Magic stuff, I haven't seen it in any of the GCs though. 

Oh no.....not again...

Posted: 14/05/2015 at 12:25

Because there is no intelligence, empathy, thought or design to any of it, and certainly no entity called Mother Nature or anything else - we are living on a lump of rock hurtling though space - the only intelligence or empathy is our own and there's little enough of it

I agree  with every word.  It's up to each and every member of the human race how we deal with life and death.  Yesterday I was at the funeral of my oldest long time friend who many people felt they had been fortunate to know.  Not because he was anywhere near to being perceived as saintly.  He was a down-to-earth, forthright man and famer who love this earth we are so fortunate to occupy and looked after his portion of it to the maximum of his considerable abilities.  He combined intelligence, perseverance and hard physical work to a remarkable degree.  We discussed, argued, disagreed on all manner of subjects for nearly 60 years.  He had a peaceful end in his home overlooking a green and pleasant land and now lies in a fine oak coffin in a beautiful ancient village churchyard. He earned that but he would have been in distress at the chaos elsewhere as he was also a kind and caring man.

 

1 to 10 of 404

Discussions started by DorsetUK

Twayblades

Green Orchids in trouble 
Replies: 4    Views: 53
Last Post: Today at 13:55

w

Replies: 4    Views: 218
Last Post: 16/04/2015 at 18:45

muscari

more than one sort 
Replies: 22    Views: 516
Last Post: 31/03/2015 at 21:28

Crocus

as in garden company 
Replies: 5    Views: 306
Last Post: 30/09/2014 at 18:42

teeny weeny caterpillars

on my beautiful rose bush this evening 
Replies: 7    Views: 338
Last Post: 25/06/2014 at 21:51

Yellow Flag (Iris) but not the usual

Replies: 9    Views: 452
Last Post: 31/10/2014 at 08:38

Herb ident please

soft grey/green foliage on woody stems, hardy 
Replies: 4    Views: 341
Last Post: 09/04/2014 at 09:08
7 threads returned