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Dovefromabove


Latest posts by Dovefromabove

Screening

Posted: 16/12/2012 at 11:45

I think this is one for the planning authority.  If approaching the council doesn't work speak to your local councillor or even MP directly.

dwarf fruit tree's

Posted: 16/12/2012 at 07:31

The size of the tree doesn't depend on the variety, but on the rootstock onto which it has been grafted, so what I suggest you need to decide are the types of  apples and pears you and your family enjoy eating.  Then investigate the varieties of trees available to buy and grow in the UK.

Another thing you will have to bear in mind is that most apples will need at least one other apple of the same pollination group nearby, and the same goes for pear trees.  Even those described as self fertile will crop better with an appropriate pollinator nearby.  

The next thing you need to decide is whether you want to grow your trees in open ground as free-standing trees or as cordons or espaliers along a fence - if you're limited for space you can grow more trees this way but you have to be prepared to learn about and carry out the right sort of pruning -  or whether you want to grow them in containers.

As I said earlier, fruit trees are grafted onto different rootstocks which determine the size the tree will grow to.    

Once you've decided what type of apples and pears you want to grow, contact a good supplier and talk to them about the size of tree you need and they will advise you about what you need.

Two good suppliers are http://www.orangepippin.com/  and http://www.readsnursery.co.uk/ both of these firms will be only too willing to help you.  

Other fruit tree suppliers are available!  

 

Liming the soil

Posted: 16/12/2012 at 07:12

Just remember not to lime where you're going to grow potatoes! 

Fork Handles

Posted: 16/12/2012 at 07:04

Good morning - my body-clock doesn't understand Sunday lay-ins 

privet hedge

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 19:54

You might find that as the privet is a greedy feeder, it has taken a lot of the goodness out of the soil, so in the land near to the hedge you might need to manure/fertilise/mulch more heavily - the same goes for watering.  

But on ;the plus side, it will attract lots of small hedgerow birds who will help keep bugs at bay, and when it blooms it will attract lots of pollinating insect - I love privet - the smell of privet always takes me back to an idyllic holiday in Brittany years ago.

Fork Handles

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 17:57

Excited to be a winner  but not overly keen on chocolate biscuits   anyone want mine?  

Form an orderly queue ...................... 

Question for a calm winter moment

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 12:49

In my view one of the difficulties about being organic in the UK is the small size of garden plot that most of us have to work on.  I gather that perhaps ThaiGer is working with a larger plot than the average UK garden.  

It is very difficult to encourage sufficient  wildlife (birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians as well as insects) to control pests in a naturall and sustainable way if the gardens surrounding you are not practising wildlife-friendly techniques too.  I am very fortunate at this garden as my immediate neighbours encourage frogs, toads and hedgehogs as well as birds and insects.  

In my previous home the neighbours' gardens were all paved over or gravelled and regularly sprayed - there was no way that there were enough birds living there to keep pests under control.  No way for hedgehogs to roam from garden to garden as all fences were hedgehog-proof and neighbours used copious sprays and slug pellets.  The only way for me to keep slugs off my lettuces was to do the same, or not grow any at all.No ponds or damp ditches for frogs and toads to hide. 

Fork Handles

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 07:25

Choc-ice ?  Nah, let me think again - a Penguin ?

Fork Handles

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 07:13

Good morning forkers   Oh dear IQ (good initials!!!) bad luck about the lights  I hope the new ones last a bit longer!

More wrapping to do here!

Composting through the winter?

Posted: 15/12/2012 at 07:10

We have two slatted wooden bins.  The first iwas started early last summer and is full of nearly made compost to mulch the garden with next spring.  The second is half full (runner bean haulms take up a lot of space but will rot down when the weather warms up).  Both bins are covered with layers of cardboard packing and a tarpaulin over the top to keep the rain/snow off.  We are still adding to the second bin with household waste - veg peelings, cabbage leaves, apple cores, tea leaves, coffee grounds etc etc and we also tear up the brown paper bags we buy our fruit and veg in from the farm shop and add those.  

It's a bit more hassle in the winter to peel the tarpaulin back and lift the cardboard off to add the contents of our kitchen composting box every day (says OH ) but it'll make lovely stuff 

Discussions started by Dovefromabove

Crown Prince squash???

What do you think?  
Replies: 10    Views: 130
Last Post: Today at 06:41

Have you seen this rose?

I can't seem to find it .............. 
Replies: 12    Views: 244
Last Post: Yesterday at 06:16

Wasps - such useful creatures

Just some of the ways they help us 
Replies: 17    Views: 197
Last Post: 13/08/2014 at 18:54

Achillea

To deadhead or not to deadhead - that is the question .... 
Replies: 40    Views: 680
Last Post: 06/08/2014 at 22:45

Please put out a shallow dish of water!

Small mammals are not enjoying the heatwave 
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Last Post: 25/07/2014 at 08:27

Brown patch on lawn

Yet another cause of brown patches on lawn identified 
Replies: 11    Views: 180
Last Post: 20/07/2014 at 14:46

DIFFICULTIES POSTING?

How to get around the current problem .... 
Replies: 94    Views: 1897
Last Post: 23/07/2014 at 22:02

Visit to the Old Vicarage Gardens, East Ruston, Norfolk. 19/07/14

Replies: 204    Views: 4152
Last Post: 22/07/2014 at 08:23

A perennial for a shady, long and very narrow border

Suggestions welcome 
Replies: 31    Views: 896
Last Post: 05/06/2014 at 21:07

Caterpillar ID

Replies: 8    Views: 277
Last Post: 04/06/2014 at 17:27

ID please

Does anyone recognise this? 
Replies: 11    Views: 439
Last Post: 03/06/2014 at 14:09

Slug Pubs - research opportunity

Which beer is best? 
Replies: 30    Views: 956
Last Post: 02/06/2014 at 16:54

Plant in need of ID

Does anyone recognise this? 
Replies: 22    Views: 857
Last Post: 24/07/2014 at 11:28

Hazels looking for a home

Free plants for Norfolk/North Suffolk gardeners 
Replies: 5    Views: 271
Last Post: 22/05/2014 at 15:26

Under-gardener Award

Sometimes they really deserve a pat on the back 
Replies: 21    Views: 533
Last Post: 19/05/2014 at 22:02
1 to 15 of 81 threads