Dovefromabove


Latest posts by Dovefromabove

Frogs on the allotment

Posted: 24/07/2012 at 06:08

Yes, the first lot of tadpoles should have left the water by now, but sometimes the conditions aren't right for all tadpoles to metamorphose - sometimes it's overcrowding, or not enough nutrition, or maybe even the wrong temperature?  Not sure about that one.  Sometimes tadpoles go into a sort of stasis and remain as tadpoles over winter, so they will need a pool that is deep enough not to freeze solid, with the right sort of mud at the bottom, plants and rocks etc.  

If you're not sure what you're doing it might be an idea to get some advice from your local Wildlife Trust - they should know of a local herpetologist who can advise you.  Way back when we were kids there were so many frogs that the loss of a few in a tank on a sunny classroom windowsill wasn't a tragedy, except for the individuals concerned.  Nowadays as individuals we have a responsibility not to cause more damage than our race has already done.

Just a thought - where did these tadpoles come from?  They are British Native frogs aren't they?  I mean you wouldn't go releasing imported frogs into the wild would you?

Frogs on the allotment

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 21:41

How are the tadpoles going to eat airborn insects?  The tadpoles need pondweed/algae or something else suitable to eat - they will also eat water fleas and other invertebrates as they get bigger.  You may find advice here http://www.wildaboutbritain.co.uk/forums/reptile-and-amphibian-forums/10066-feed-tadpoles.html

Also here http://wildlife.blurtit.com/q401784.html

Hopefully there are plants and rocks in your little pond  for the tadpoles to hide in or they'll get eaten by birds (amongst other visitors to the pond).

 

Frogs on the allotment

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 20:59

What've they got to eat (other than each other)?

Leggy sedums

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 06:21

Christopher2, that's interesting - when would you expect them to flower if you cut them back now?

bees

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 06:17

Yes, please don't do anything yourself - contact either a bee-keeping society or your local wildlife trust.

HELP

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 06:14

Oh dear, that sounds sad 

Do I take it you're in the UK?  I'll answer as if you are ....

I think maybe you've been too kind to your plants.  Lavenders like a well-drained gritty soil, and what with the awful weather we've been having, plus your watering it, you may have drowned the roots (even roots need oxygen).  And plants rarely need feeding once a week if planted in the open ground - they've had too much tlc.  

The sunshine we're getting now might improve things for them - don't water and don't feed - actually a little benign neglect at the moment might be good - and see if they look better in a week or two.

What sort of plants have you got?

SYSTEMIC PESTICIDES

Posted: 23/07/2012 at 06:09

We sat out in the garden until late yesterday evening, on the first warm evening we've had for ages - it was heartening to see various bumble bees, hover flies and lots of little flies and moths flitting about our garden.  

Other people are talking about having poorly pollinated crops and runner beans failing to set - we appear to have loads of little runner beans forming on our plants - we must be doing something right 

Aubergines

Posted: 22/07/2012 at 21:16

Zoomer, this site http://www.simplyseed.co.uk/aubergine-seeds/black-beauty.html reckons they should get to about 12 cm when they're ready to harvest.

SYSTEMIC PESTICIDES

Posted: 22/07/2012 at 08:57

The lawn here at our new home has been fairly neglected for years and has a wide variety of plants in it and is loved by the bees.  Regular raking and weekly cutting has made it look more like a lawn, without removing the clover, wild majoram and self-heal (amonst others) that bring the bees to our lawn.

The front lawn has had builders' skips and 1 ton bags of sand etc all over it, and we had thought we would have it re-turfed, but we've discovered that it too is full of white clover and the bees love it, so when the builders have finished their work on the house we're going to try just re-seeding the bare patches left by the builders' detritus so that we can keep the clover.  

When digging earlier this year I  found the larva of a stag beetle on some dead wood under the back lawn 

getting on with the neighbours

Posted: 22/07/2012 at 08:49

What a horrid situation - you have my sympathy.

When we moved here 11 months ago we discovered that over the previous 20+ years the garden here had been increasingly overtaken by ivy and huge conifers, due to the poor health of the elderly couple who lived here and who had previously been keen gardeners.  I've seen photographs of the house covered with ivy, which was removed and the house repaired by the last owner.  However all he did in the garden was lop the conifers, mow the grass occasionally and give the ivy on the fences an annual strim.  Within a week of our moving in here the weight of heavy rain in the ivy brought fencing crashing down -  I went around to tell the neighbours and apologise with some trepidation.  Fortunately they understood that it wasn't our fault and it was certainly a novel way of getting to know them as we all removed 3 skips full of ivy and rotten fencing and dug out the roots.  The neighbours on one side accepted responsibility for replacing their fence - saying they'd wanted to do it for years but it hadn't been worth it until there was someone living here who wouldn't let the ivy run rampant again.  We replaced the fencing at the back and the other side - this involved builders digging out and rebuilding a retaining wall as the garden to one side is lower than ours.  In all we spent getting on for £3,000 on new fencing and walling!  

Our neighbours are happy for us to grow roses clematis and honeysuckle etc against their fence, but we have promised that we will not plant ivy or Russian Vine (yes, there was some of that there too, and reaching 25 feet into a tree).

So you'll see,  I do understand that your neighbours might well have fears of something similar happening in the future.  Is there any way you can invite them over to your side of the fence (maybe a little informal neighbourhood 'Open Garden' with tea and scones, and selling a few cuttings etc for a local charity?)  so that they can see that you 'garden' and control your plants and don't intend to just let them run riot?  After all, from their side of the fence all they can see is greenery looming and if they've had bad experiences in the past ... 

Good luck 

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