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Edd


Latest posts by Edd

Scarifying: what is it?

Posted: Yesterday at 12:11

Depends on the size of your lawn and the effort you consider to be reasonable.

Lawn care is below and you may want to consider getting a scarifier. (see other link)

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/basics/how-to-improve-your-lawn/179.html

http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/tools-and-techniques/hiring-a-lawn-scarifier/611918.html

 

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 04/03/2015 at 15:30

Thanks 1Runnybeak1.

Did you get your picture/iPad problem sorted?

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 17:01

Can you post pics from a iPad? 

Thanks for the numbers.

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 16:54

Have you checked your Forum settings 1Runnybeak1. You may have accidental altered something. Remember you need advanced editor. The system may have automatically changed something. Not sure why it would but it is worth a check.

How do you prick out antirrhinum

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 04:13

You can try some now. 

Do you have thousands. I know they are small/tiny.

Leave the rest and see how they develop. Some will die and (you might need to remove them) you can pick them off but I would say you need to thin them out any way at this stage.

Vermicomposting for begginers

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 04:04

Will worms digest sawdust?


The short answer to this question is no. Worms do not possess the
digestive capability to process (and derive nutrients from)
materials such as woodchips and sawdust. 

Pure sawdust has an extremely high C:N ratio. It has an
extremely resistant structure - made up of cellulose, hemicellulose
and lignin, the compounds responsible for the strength and
structural integrity of woody plants (just look at trees)

Woody wastes tends to be broken down very slowly over
time, primarily by fungi. This is not to say that you can't make
sawdust and woodchips more worm-friendly and then use it as a
food source. Some extra steps will be necessary.

If I wanted to use some sawdust in my worm systems I would first
mix it with something rich in nitrogen - farm animal manure would
be a great choice - then let it sit for at least a few months to
encourage some rotting. large hot composting piles will help.

Another opertinity is to use the sawdust to
grow edible mushrooms, such as Shitake or Oyster mushrooms, which
actually rely on woody materials for their nutrition. Then when
your crop has finished fruiting you can mix the spent substrate
(which will be full of fungal mycelium) with other worm foods,
such as manure or food scraps, and start feeding it to your
worms.

Wood digesting fungi such as these have specialized enzymes which
aid in breaking down the resistant structure of woody materials,
rendering them more prone to attack by other microorganisms.

Woodchips and saw dust can't soak up moisture the way paper and
cardboard can, so apart from offering little nutrition they can't
even be used as an inert bedding material (unless well rotted and
mixed with other materials).

Something else to keep in mind if you are thinking about using
sawdust or woodchips in your worm beds - even if you do mix them
with manure etc and allow them to rot, you are almost certainly
going to be left with some woody debris in your vermicompost.

For the casual hobby vermicomposter this certainly isn't a big
deal, but for someone who is keen to sell their castings this
might be an important consideration since your final product may
not look as finished as you would like it to (even if it may still
be an excellent compost).

Seedling/Weed ID

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 03:14

Great result.

You must Try sterilising you seed compost, before you begin. It's only for a short time before you pot on. 

Your results speak for themselves. 

Isn't nature wonderful 

Lilies & Cats

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 03:03

True lilies Mark 499?

Please expand

How do you prick out antirrhinum

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 03:01

Yes it is hard when there are so many. Prick a few out with a knife and transplant into a pots. Let them grow and pull out the smaller (weaker seedlings) untill you have enough to handle (one or two. Three max) You can always try to pot on the ones you have taken out.

Transplant your seedlings 5 cm apart in seed trays and grow on. Gradually acclimatise the Antirrhinum plants to outside conditions before planting out 15cm apart in a sunny position.

They are fun to grow.

Bell Pepper problems

Posted: 03/03/2015 at 02:10

Wow. I have the same problem with worms.

 

http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/talkback/vermicomposting-for-begginers/255110.html

 

Discussions started by Edd

Are you square or round and Iron willed?

Replies: 8    Views: 212
Last Post: 28/02/2015 at 06:55

Starting?

Replies: 12    Views: 295
Last Post: 28/02/2015 at 11:10

Mimosa pudica

Replies: 4    Views: 101
Last Post: 28/02/2015 at 01:14

Replanting Green Onions/spring onions.

Replies: 9    Views: 221
Last Post: 03/03/2015 at 01:12

ISIS problem.

Replies: 10    Views: 589
Last Post: 01/01/2015 at 16:39

Egg dilemma?

Replies: 11    Views: 358
Last Post: 01/01/2015 at 00:11

Rain water

Replies: 6    Views: 319
Last Post: 17/12/2014 at 01:29

The National Rose Society books. Need new home.

Replies: 17    Views: 613
Last Post: 16/12/2014 at 10:05

Trilliums for Lily.

Replies: 1    Views: 191
Last Post: 25/11/2014 at 19:26

Got this nice present today and i know its not from here.

Replies: 24    Views: 1193
Last Post: 15/07/2014 at 23:29

Slug farmers. Volunteers needed. (There's is method in my madness)

Replies: 13    Views: 674
Last Post: 03/03/2015 at 07:17

Is it just me?

Replies: 43    Views: 1358
Last Post: 06/06/2014 at 09:54

Dare i or not???

should i plant this or not? 
Replies: 6    Views: 575
Last Post: 25/04/2014 at 08:57

Major boo boo!

Replies: 10    Views: 569
Last Post: 02/04/2014 at 15:09

Paper pots, first year. Will this become a problem.

Replies: 3    Views: 808
Last Post: 20/03/2014 at 12:26
1 to 15 of 25 threads