London (change)
Today 7°C / 2°C
Tomorrow 8°C / 7°C

Emma Crawforth


Latest posts by Emma Crawforth

Welcome to the problem solving forum

Posted: 07/12/2011 at 17:02

Hello J Seymour,

Some people recommend using a small hand-held vacuum cleaner on whitefly. You are supposed to attack them in the morning when it is cold and they are sluggish. Next you put the vacuum cleaner in the freezer overnight and empty it the next morning. I haven't tried this myself. Silver foil used as a mulch is also suggested. This should be put down at the time of planting. Removal of old leaves and debris is also good to get rid of eggs and young.

Thank you for coming on to the forum with this problem. Please do let us know how you are getting on.

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team

Brambles

Posted: 07/12/2011 at 15:33

Hello Scottish Lass,

Brambles can be pretty, and popular with wildlife, but I wouldn't recommend propagating them. They are very invasive. If you want the benefits of brambles, with fewer drawbacks, you could try some cultivated fruit varieties. For example, on the website at:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/rubus-fruticosus-loch-ness/2502.html

you'll find a profile for a blackberry called 'Loch Ness'.

Or you might consider the autumn-fruiting raspberry, 'Autumn Bliss'

http://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/rubus-idaeus-autumn-bliss/2503.html

Perhaps somebody at your allotment site has a good fruit variety they can recommend?

Good luck,

Emma

gardenersworld.com team

Welcome to the garden design forum

Posted: 06/12/2011 at 10:10

Hello Happymarion,

I'm so glad you allowed your scots pine seedling to grow. A mature scots pine with its red bark is a very beautiful thing. Pine forests are very important for the beleaguered red squirrel too.

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team

Welcome to the plants forum

Posted: 06/12/2011 at 09:55

Hello Happymarion,

Thank you for your picture of the fruits on the ginkgo. It looks quite festive doesn't it? As you say, it is possible to buy new cultivars of ginkgo. Anyone who would like to make a study of them could visit Kew Gardens to see quite a few of them in the heart of the bamboo garden.

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team

Mildew

Posted: 06/12/2011 at 09:41

Hello Hedgehog,

You could try enticing birds into your garden with the following projects from gardenersworld.com:

Making fat cakes for birds -

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/birds-fat-cakes/

Making pine cone feeders for birds -

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/bird-feeder-pine-cones/

Installing a window bird feeder -

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/birds-window-feeder/

The last one is particularly exciting. I've seen them in action and you really do get the birds coming right up to your window. I hope one of these projects appeals to you.

Emma

gardenersworld.com team

Welcome to the garden design forum

Posted: 05/12/2011 at 12:24

Hello Happymarion,

That's a lovely photo. It gives me the opportunity to talk about the benefits of conifers in gardens. So many people don't like them. But where would your Kiftsgate pool be without the magnificently cut yew hedges around it? I love conifers. Does anybody else have a good photo / story about gardening with conifers?

Emma

The Gardeners' World web team

Welcome to the plants forum

Posted: 05/12/2011 at 11:36

Hello Happymarion,

Thanks for your lovely picture of the ginkgo. The leaves are a really wonderful yellow. In a street that I walk down on my way to work, there is a female ginkgo. I know that it is female because for weeks now it has been dropping rancid-smelling 'fruits' all over the pavement. I love walking past it in the morning as ginkgos are such special trees for many reasons. However I think I'd be a bit fed up if I lived in the house that is situated a few feet away from it!

Emma

The Gardeners' World web team

Starting from scratch

Posted: 05/12/2011 at 10:08

Hello Warthog,

In my veg plot I have had to remove rubble, black polythene and many perennial weeds. The previous occupiers tended to lay new soil over the weeds and plant on top. This was surprisingly successful but in the long run makes for a very messy garden. As a result I've had to spend hours during my weekend simply digging up weeds and rubbish, putting it in a wheelbarrow and taking it to a skip/ compost heap. Unfortunately, it sounds as though you might have to do the same thing. Tenacious bushes can be got rid of by cutting them down and digging up the roots but it is a long job. If you have rushes and horsetail, they are there because, as you say, your land is boggy. Short of putting in a new drainage system, it is likely to remain that way and weeds that like those conditions will return.

Have a look at our advice on dealing with horsetail at:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/problem-solving/weeds-horsetail-field/

As you can see, constant cutting of the top will weaken the plant as it can't photosynthesise without leaves. This is a long term strategy  - you would need to keep coming back to it again and again.

As before, I do recommend planting things that you like if you can find space. Willows and Alders love boggy ground and are very attractive. The theory is that they could out-compete the things you don't like.

Please also see our list of plants suitable for boggy soil at:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/plant/collections/6/7/boggy.

However do make sure any plants you pick will be hardy in your area.

One thing that has made working in my veg plot more fun in difficult times is doing it with friends. I hope you can find some good company to dig and cart alongside you.

Please do let us know how it goes.

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team.

children and gardening

Posted: 05/12/2011 at 09:43

Hello Hedgehog,

It's heartening to hear that you kept your children interested with gardening activities.

On the website we have a project involving growing peanut plants at:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/peanut-plant-growing/

This is aimed at giving children a quick plant to grow - with speedy and exciting consequences. I have also found sunflowers a good bet. In fact I still get excited by them myself.

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team.

lawn edging shears

Posted: 05/12/2011 at 09:35

Hello Hedgehog,

It is good to hear from somebody who enjoys pruning. A lot of people are afraid of it in case they cut the wrong bit. But you can make such a difference to flowering and fruiting if you get it right. My favourite tip is to stand back and look at the shrub or tree before you begin. Sometimes you can see a whole branch that is not thriving and needs to be removed. If you cut that out at the base you can make a big difference in a short time. Does anybody have any favourite pruning tips they'd like to share?

Emma.

gardenersworld.com team.

Discussions started by Emma Crawforth

How old is your houseplant?

Let us know if you have an ancient aspidistra or senescent spider plant 
Replies: 17    Views: 642
Last Post: 11/11/2014 at 16:05

Big Garden Birdwatch

Big Garden Birdwatch 
Replies: 7    Views: 886
Last Post: 24/02/2012 at 15:50

Hedgehogs

Do you want to help hedgehogs? 
Replies: 26    Views: 2365
Last Post: 15/05/2012 at 21:27

Winter pruning

Replies: 2    Views: 1163
Last Post: 13/01/2012 at 17:00

children and gardening

Replies: 7    Views: 774
Last Post: 27/02/2012 at 15:44

lawn edging shears

Replies: 5    Views: 1783
Last Post: 02/02/2012 at 23:47

Mildew

Replies: 4    Views: 711
Last Post: 06/01/2012 at 15:41

sweet peas

Replies: 2    Views: 823
Last Post: 05/12/2011 at 09:28
8 threads returned