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Excitable Boy


Latest posts by Excitable Boy

Talkback: Hedgehog spotting

Posted: 29/11/2012 at 20:21

 

Suecamp wrote (see)
 I have put some water outside and some food that I bought specially from a pet shop as I wasn't sure what they ate apart from slugs and snails.
....
I'm now hoping that they'll help me next year when they come out of hibernation by eating the slugs and snails on my vegetable garden!

 

Guys/Girls, Please be aware that Hedgehogs DO NOT eat large numbers of slugs and snails. The majority of a hedgehog's diet comprises insects, beetles, caterpillars, small vertebrates and sometimes eggs. They will eat about 5% slugs and snails but only if VERY hungry. Slugs and snails are a very bad food for hedgehogs as they contain lots of lungworm larvae and fluke larvae both of which are killers.

If you see a hog out in the daytime (ever) or any small hedgehogs at this time of year please pick them up and take them to a hedgehog rescue centre asap. Hedgehogs need to weigh at least 800g to hibernate successfully, so if you see smaller ones now please rescue them immediately. Pop them in a bucket, put a towel on top of them, bring inside to keep them warm and call the centre. If you do find a small one please check around as there will frequently be siblings. Most hedgehogs have hibernated by now. They do wake up to eat and drink but only for very short periods, so most you see out and about now are in trouble.

I have a couple of injured hogs in my walled garden who came from a rescue centre as they are too damaged to survive in the wild. They are truly lovely little animals, (although not terribly bright) and it is very rewarding to see them bumbling around at dusk. The simplest and best food for them is a meat based small cat or kitten biscuit. If you regularly see hogs in your garden it would be kind to keep some out, preferably in a catproof feeder (see websites mentioned above for design), as well as some fresh water for hibernating hedgehogs who have stirred.



Talkback: Growing herbs

Posted: 28/06/2012 at 23:35

I planted some coriander for the first time ever about ten days ago and it is up and looking good, so it must be easy to grow! Nice that the early leaves look like the mature ones too - it's reassuring it's not just another patch of weeds. (Unlike basil which always seems to turn into fat hen in my garden).

The packet I sowed (Mr.Fothergill's) says "Coriander" and then underneath "Cilantro (for leaf)". The pack next to it said it was for seeds, but didn't have Cilantro on the front, (I think),

Has anyone spotted French tarragon plants in any of the supermarkets/garden centres or pound shops? I grew some of the russian stuff but it's pretty tasteless.

Gardeners World - not back for 4 weeks!

Posted: 28/06/2012 at 23:19

Given the choice between that arrogant prat Murray and one of those awful grunting women at Wimbledon or Monty Don and Carol Klein I think the majority would go for the latter. How can this be so difficult for the Beeb to grasp?

I feel a strongly worded letter coming on.

Not sure about Tichmarsh's latest effort either. Hopefully it will improve.

 

Talkback: How to build a raised bed

Posted: 22/06/2012 at 17:21

Pretzel, it's your garden - do what suits you! If you are on a severe slope position your beds with the long side ACROSS the slope - this way you won't have the problem described by Netherfield. As Paul says Pozidrive screws are best for fitting the boards to the posts - you can get good ones which you hammer in to start with and then drill home.

creepy crawlies in the soil on the allotment

Posted: 20/06/2012 at 23:22

@ FloBear: I'm full of useless information - my wife even has a word for it!

@ marshmello: Yes I'd imagine these are they - loads in my garden too, although you don't see many proper centipedes (the larger ones) which is a shame as they are pretty fierce beasties:

http://eol.org/pages/576/overview

Quite easily take down a small horse, lol.

What's this?

Posted: 20/06/2012 at 18:36

Really good question! 

 

I didn't see the program, but my guess is Celosia

 

Do I get a prize? 

spots on spuds

Posted: 20/06/2012 at 18:28

Pennypat, if your potatoes are first earlies and you have had better weather than me then they should be turning yellow and dying back around now as they're ready! Lots of potatoes have silver/white spots/pores as marshmello says, they can just be more noticeable on smaller early potatoes.

Enjoy your spuds!!

creepy crawlies in the soil on the allotment

Posted: 20/06/2012 at 18:14

Sounds more like a centipede to me if it's flat and orange. If the legs come out the sides it's a centipede, if they're underneath it's a millipede - these are usually black.

Centipedes are your friends as they are carnivorous and eat lots of nasties.

Slugs and snails - help needed!!

Posted: 20/06/2012 at 15:59

Given the scale of the problem I think I'm with David K and Geoff on this one. Sometimes you have to use chemicals to get things back in balance. The most effective stuff I ever used was a drench called "Slug It" many years ago - don't know whether it is still available.

The best long term solution is the encourage wildlife one, but that takes a lot of time.

Red Onions - Buds Forming

Posted: 19/06/2012 at 18:21

Bob, just remove the flower stalk and  let them grow on until you need them, but remember to use them first come harvest time.

Discussions started by Excitable Boy

Target Greenhouse temperatures and plant positioning

Replies: 2    Views: 164
Last Post: 10/05/2014 at 08:41

Greenhouse flooring

Replies: 1    Views: 253
Last Post: 12/04/2014 at 13:33

Pergola Problem

Replies: 0    Views: 625
Last Post: 24/04/2012 at 10:25
3 threads returned