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Fairygirl


Latest posts by Fairygirl

Something has eaten the plastic lid of my slug pellets

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 19:10

Bob - did it gladden your heart? ... 

The other side of Monty Don.

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 19:08

nut 

Quite so 

Gladioli Corms

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 19:04

Bumping this up for you Charles in case someone can help you. 

If you have a pic that will help ID the problem, if any. 

What to prune now and when? Please read my message :) Thank you

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 19:02

Paul -  I think the magazine does  a pruning item at various times but not 100% sure. If you use the search  facility at the top of the page and type in something like 'shrubs to prune in autumn' that might point you in the  right direction.  Alternatively, if you know what shrubs are in the garden, you could list them here and you'll get help and advice from forum members  

The other side of Monty Don.

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 18:58

So - not a fan then Jack?....

Which type of Bamboo to plant?

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 18:56

Snoodle - that's very naughty 

He will tell you under no circumstances plant bamboo! 

The clump formers - Fargesia - are the ones that would be suitable, and in my experience they don't pose too much of a problem on clay soil.  

Advice for novice?

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 18:40

I'd just do a general tidying up - weeding etc -  and then see what comes through over the next few months as Frank says. They're could be some hidden gems.

Take photos and post them here - you're far more likely to get an ID quickly and correctly from the many knowledgeable people on here 

Work in Progress

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 18:06

Hi Eddie - sorry to hear that you've not been well. It was nice that someone posted on here because it was lovely seeing these brilliant sculptures again, and I'm equally impressed with your new project too. 

You don't like doing things by half do you? 

Mine's a Margherita with lots of basil by the way....

Watering in Viburnum tinus 'Gwenillian'

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 17:58

Hi Ellen - yes the east coast is generally colder but drier, whereas we get long cold wet winters, although we do get frost and snow as well. I can see how it might be tricky to keep enough moisture for plants with your soil conditions! The more planting you have, the greater the competition for moisture too. You're doing the right thing by mulching anyway, and that will help prevent freezing as well as retaining moisture in dry weather.

Can you get farmyard manure there? It helps enormously with moisture retention, and conversely helps with breaking up and improving heavy clay. If you have a riding school or stables nearby they're usually happy to give some away, but it's also available in a bagged,ready to use form here in GCs and DIY stores. Some of that dug into borders should help with water retention and boosts the nutrient levels. Interesting that you're also seeing a definite change in your weather there.

Hope the Viburnum is doing fine 

Small garden needs help

Posted: 05/10/2014 at 14:14

Jessie - if you like minimalist, then I'd clear most of that out.

Cue - loads of people throwing up their hands in horror! For a small space, less is more. Use a group of statement plants (evergreen) for the back corner or along the back wall,  which work together, and then have your 'hot' flowers in large matching pots or containers for spring through to autumn when the structural group will take over. You could add a big pot , a statue or something similar to give a nice view from the house. If the camellia's happy and you like it, use that as a starting point for the evergreen group, and the bay tree makes a nice feature too.

The mistake most people make with small spaces is to use lots of small fiddly plants and it just looks messy and jarring. Have your area for growing food and herbs linked to the rest of the area by having matching hard materials - a timber edge to match your deck for instance. It's hard to make that simple by the very nature of it, so don't try - just keep it in tune with the rest.   I'd take the paving away and use gravel. You can tie that in to the overall colour scheme too. That leaves lots of options for seating and dining whether in sun or shade. For impact with your brighter plants - put three matching containers together along the edge of the deck. They will be a minimalist statement in themselves and you can simply plant them up for seasonal interest. If you want extra colour, use the verticals as you're already doing, but again, just tie in the materials you use with the rest. Keep hard landscaping materials to two or three types. You have a nice walls, you have decking , so the rest of the space should be one type of material.

Hope that's of some help and interest. Don't keep anything you don't like, or if it doesn't work for your space and the time you have available.  

 

Discussions started by Fairygirl

green manure

intended new lawn area - worth trying? 
Replies: 4    Views: 146
Last Post: 11/10/2014 at 14:32

forum gremlins

Replies: 12    Views: 653
Last Post: 26/09/2013 at 22:04

Bee programme tonight

 
Replies: 7    Views: 503
Last Post: 03/08/2013 at 15:22

spam reported

 
Replies: 12    Views: 544
Last Post: 26/07/2013 at 14:22

Common Swift (moth)

 
Replies: 2    Views: 604
Last Post: 25/07/2013 at 23:48

our building projects

Replies: 9    Views: 721
Last Post: 17/08/2013 at 19:04

slugs, snails and bees

Replies: 2    Views: 490
Last Post: 13/06/2013 at 14:24

cufcskim's reply!

Replies: 4    Views: 546
Last Post: 02/06/2013 at 16:34

kitchen spam-don't answer it!

Replies: 3    Views: 555
Last Post: 27/05/2013 at 17:23

spam issues

Replies: 28    Views: 1103
Last Post: 08/05/2013 at 03:53

No posts either

Replies: 13    Views: 726
Last Post: 14/04/2013 at 10:18
11 threads returned