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Fairygirl


Latest posts by Fairygirl

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 17:06

In now and having a cuppa. That robin gets a strop on if I don't come inside to let him get his tea  

Lots more turf dug out for the paths and membrane and base gravel laid . I have 2 tonnes of gravel coming next Friday so I need to be prepared for all the shovelling...

Also took down the ash tree that was growing at the back corner of the garden behind the shed. Wasn't very big, about 12 feet, but wasn't in a great place - it's pushing out into the edge of  the pavement. 

Glad you got the pooter organised KEF 

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 11:02

Chopping at concrete with a spade is never a good idea RB...

Chopping at tree roots isn't great for wrists either...I speak from experience...

 

Hawthorn hedge in the winter

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 10:53

If you can stick in a few other whips of something like beech or hornbeam, they will complement the hawthorn but they retain their foliage over winter which might help. The hawthorn will be well rejuvenated if you cut it back hard, which will thicken it up as nut says, and that will help enormously when the foliage drops.  Some screens of trellis and climbers a few feet in front of the hedge will add privacy in summer when you might need it a bit more. They don't have to be wide or completely solid. We did a similar thing at last house as the conservatory - and patio next to it - were quite exposed. There was a basic 'screen' of posts and poles so we added trellis to the middle of these sections and planted ivy on them. It didn't interfere with our views but just gave a bit more privacy when we were outside. 

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 10:31

Nice to 'see' you archie - great result for the missus . Enjoy your celebratory curry and extras later 

Should really shift myself now and get on. Daughter will want collecting from her friend too. Why does she have to have one who lives somewhere that's not within walking distance or on a bus route...

Garden Gallery 2014

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 10:23

I did nut 

Think my Fatsia may have flowers next year chicky. I used to love them - very architectural aren't they? I often wonder if I could sneak round to my previous house round the corner and see if the Fatsia's still there. It was about 7 to 8 feet when I left. 

Garden Gallery 2014

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 09:48

Just went out and took these as the sun starts to break through the fog.

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130001_zpsb231a1f4.jpg

 

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130004_zpse5b61e7e.jpg

 

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130006_zps3f37d0f7.jpg

 

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130003_zpsf39fab2c.jpg

 

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130007_zps79938a86.jpg

 

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PB130005_zps055d5438.jpg

 

building houses on green belt land

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 09:34

I agree with WillDB about new housing having trees and other wildlife built into the plans. The area I grew up in was basically a village, now 40/50 years on the place is totally unrecognisable. They are now building a small group of very large houses in a site next to the area where my family home was. It's involved cutting into a steep hill at the back, and the houses are practically sitting on the main road at the front. The gardens  look tiny as far as I can see, and, like many of the new developments,  the internal 'roads' are being done with those brick paviours. It will be very sterile. The entire area is houses, houses and more houses yet the schools are full to bursting and the main shopping centre is too small to cope. It's all very sad to see. 

Small pond

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 09:21

Any size of pond is worth it DD. As philippa said - get the balance right with plants in the pond and don't forget the surrounding planting areas too, and it will be an asset. I've had ponds of all sizes from a few feet long to 60 feet long and they all do the job of attracting wildlife. The brighter the spot it's in the better but a tiny water lily will help with the surface shading. My girls bought me a pygmy one recently for my birthday for my tiny new pond here  

http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/PA310003_zps1093b799.jpg

 

No Leaves on Hornbeam

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 09:14

The milder weather has caused lots of plants of all types to be springing into life early Kayjay. Spring bulbs are doing the same - when the weather becomes cold enough the growth will slow. I wouldn't worry too much - Hornbeam's pretty tough. It makes a beautiful hedge. 

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 15/11/2014 at 08:51

Make me one too KEF please 

Morning all - don't know if it's good - can't see much outside! Ok..slight exaggeration.. 

Very foggy but I think it's to be dry and quite sunny so I may get outdoors for a while. Not been on here this week so will have a look round to see what you've been up to while I have tea and a little something 

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11 threads returned