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gardengirl6


Latest posts by gardengirl6

hellp me identify this plant

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 22:47

It is pretty and the bees love it ...but, I would get rid of it fast!

Is this an ash tree?

Posted: 29/08/2012 at 22:49

I believe it may have some thorns, too?

why don't people bother to read post before answering them.

Posted: 29/08/2012 at 22:48

To the poster who wanted to know what Non Sequiter means, it means that you can't prune your roses!

Papaver orientalis Patty's Plum

Posted: 29/08/2012 at 09:30

Oh Tim.    How disappointing, and not very encouraging for us.     However, I always take the attitude that a plant has two choices, either it grows or it doesn't.     I often tell it so, as well!     If it doesn't do well, I tell myself that it isn't my gardening skills responsible for the failure, but the climate, the plant or my soil.    There are so many beautiful flowering plants I can't get hung up over a failure or two.   Penstemons are beautiful, and so reliable.     Good luck with them. 

lily beetle

Posted: 28/08/2012 at 21:42

Sorry, but there is no good news here.    It is a continuous, daily battle!

why don't people bother to read post before answering them.

Posted: 28/08/2012 at 17:46

Well, there's nowt as queer as folks, they say.    I expect we all have our own little gripe.    Mine is being asked to identify a plant without a photograph, when the description could fit so many flowers.    Or am I going off topic now?

Papaver orientalis Patty's Plum

Posted: 28/08/2012 at 17:37

I also bought Patty's Plum this year.    All my poppies rotted off - I just put it down to the rain.    I chopped off all the foliage, and am hoping for better luck next year!    Good luck with yours.

Is this an ash tree?

Posted: 28/08/2012 at 17:35

Possibly a Robinia?

Acer problems

Posted: 27/08/2012 at 23:05

Acers don't like too much direct sun.    My south-facing garden has no shady areas, so my acer leaves usually end up brown on the tips.   But they fall off anyway and new ones will grow next year, so I don't worry about it.

Spring Garden

Posted: 27/08/2012 at 23:02

When buying tulips from a specialist supplier at a flower show, I was told that if you want tulips to last in the ground from one year to the next, you need to plant them at least twelve inches down.       Not sure if this actually works, as I have never managed to dig a hole that deep!

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