gardenning granny


Latest posts by gardenning granny

Pots and Containers

Posted: 23/02/2016 at 12:26

slightly different tack - I needed large containers  for small shrubs and found big, square, black, rubbery plastic tubs in the builders merchants - intended for mixing cement I think.  They have a handle at either side so I have them on wheeled trolleys and can move them about as needed.

I've also used big green "muck tubs".  The beauty of these is that you can feed into them easily.  Don't forget to drill in some drainage holes though.  I usually place them round the edge, a little way up the side from the bottom so that I don't lose all the water I put in during a hot dry summer.

These are lighter to move around than pottery ones.

That said - the GC has some very nice ceramic pots in many colours and lavender likes to be dry - it also likes the sun!  Hydrangeas need lots of water and hellebores cope with daplled shade.

Hope that helps a bit.

A Gardener's Hands

Posted: 22/02/2016 at 10:37

I have very dry hands so I tend to wear Briars ripply-rubber gloves, but as you say, they have to come off for delicate work.  They've been a godsend as I am potting up plants for a sale at the moment.  Then it's Lidl handcream - absolutely the best I've ever used and it vanishes so doesn't leave your hands feeling greasy.  Probably the last thing I do every night, massage the handcream in and wave my hands around!

Iris flowering - is this a problem

Posted: 07/02/2016 at 15:47

Butterbear - I would plant them in a pot and keep sheltered (in a Green house if you have one) and just damp.  If they come up plant them where you want them - if they don't....the compost heap.  I plant anything I find regardless of whether it's the right time or not.  If they do flower at the wrong time, they will correct themselves the following year.

Iris flowering - is this a problem

Posted: 04/02/2016 at 09:51

A good place to see them en masse, if you are near enough, is in the winter garden walk at Anglesey Abbey.  Not sure when their snowdrop weeks are, but the iris arwe usually abundant at the same time.

Woodland species that can tolerate strong sunlight?

Posted: 02/02/2016 at 18:32

It certainly sounds impressive.  I shall look forward to seeing the pictures in the height of summer to see just what does like growing in this system. 

Good luck and keep us up to date please.

Another Vine Weevil warning

Posted: 01/02/2016 at 18:07

thanks for the reminder; I seem to have brought an infestation of some kind of greenfly in on one of my plants and that's spreading.....just found some little pest control pellets to pop in the soil so hope that;'s going to do the trick.

Oh no.....NOT AGAIN

Posted: 01/02/2016 at 18:01

you know they will be puny little specimens and they will arrive at the same time as the belated winter snow and frost so you'll not be able to do anything with them.  Be strong Verdun, delete the mail now and look at your own photo album of the fabulous things you grow without the suppliers help.

Now a chocolate biscuit will make everything all right again.

Woodland species that can tolerate strong sunlight?

Posted: 01/02/2016 at 17:56

They also recommend wood chippings for soft paths - I can't imagine what would like to grow in them.  Our local tree surgeons deposit their chippings in a nearby field - great mounds of them - and nothing seems to grow over the heaps, not even grass or moss.  I would have thought it would need a decently deep layer of soil over the top.  What does your "back to Eden" manual say Steve?

The forest floor is not made of wood chippings, but from well rotted leaves.....isn't it?

Poor quality clematis?

Posted: 01/02/2016 at 17:45

Clematis always look dead in the winter, though it could by now be showing a few growth buds.  Montana is pretty vigorous so should throw up a new shoot or two in the spring.  On older plants you have to be careful when you tie the new growth in as the stems are very brittle and break easily.

Iris flowering - is this a problem

Posted: 01/02/2016 at 17:41

That's gorgeous.

The bulb iris' are spring flowering and often appear with the snowdrops.  Some of mine are flowering too.  Don't worry about the foliage - it will follow and that plant looks healthy enough to me.  The only problem is later on in the year when you forget where you planted them and dig them up by mistake.

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