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gardenning granny


Latest posts by gardenning granny

2014

Posted: 18/02/2014 at 15:34

Hello again Marion - it really has been lovely in the sunshine - between the showers. It is such a pleasure to see everything bursting forth in your garden.

thought I'd just share some crocus and rosehips with you, and the fascinating euphorbia myrsinites which do so well both here and in my vertical rock garden in the Languedoc.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37740.jpg?width=398&height=484&mode=max

 

Sorry - I don't think I've quite got the hang of uploading photos yet - some of these seem to have rotated - ah well, we seniors must continue to learn new skills!

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37725.jpg?width=344&height=419&mode=max

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37726.jpg?width=382&height=465&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37728.jpg?width=375&height=456&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37730.jpg?width=335&height=395&mode=max

 

 My shady bed is full of double snowdrops, amongst cyclamen coum (and some low growing geraniums, dormant right now) - strange to think they will be completely concealed once the Allium Christophii and Crocosmia Lucifer take over later in the year.

2014

Posted: 14/02/2014 at 16:05

....love it!  I'll just have to content myself with mincemeat (homemade of course) topped apple sponge pudding (still eating last year's crop) and custard - but cheered up by a pot of pushkinias outside the french windows - a large pot, because I found the bulbs in the shed in December, and not recognising them put them all spaced out over the top of a large pot.  There they all are - their little blue stripes glinting ubnder the raindrops.

2014

Posted: 13/02/2014 at 10:56

Sun is out this morning - primroses flowering, and the spring bulbs making progress every day.  My garden is filled with plants that selfseed in the wrong place and have to be moved, but the crocus, along with the violets which will appear soon, will just have to stay in the grass.  You've inspired me to fill a few seed pots, though I will have to book them into my friends seedling B & B whilst I am away for a month in March.  Trouble is, the pots are small enough to accomodate, its after they've been pricked out into individual pots that the space problem raises its head.  O only have an ancient small cold greenhouse, but I put portable cheap tower staging in to cope with as many trays as possible. 

Do hope you don't get too much rain - it's so soul destroying.

Can I move a foxglove now ?

Posted: 13/02/2014 at 10:27

Gosh - I've never found them that fussy, though they don't like to be dry.  Their natural habitat is light woodland with dappled shade.  There is a wonderful meadow of foxgloves in light woodland as you go into the Woburn Estate  in spring.  I think they wallow in the leaf mould which keeps their roots moist.

Orchids

Posted: 13/02/2014 at 10:20

you got it. Tracey!  and I think Ikea have the ones with tiny yellow dancing lady flowers sometimes too.

Shady blooms from seed - Help!

Posted: 12/02/2014 at 17:36

Mike is right - we all need a helping hand from time to time!  Start a compost heap to boost your soil fertility, this will then help all manner of things to grow.  Then start asking your friends and neighbours for bits from their gardens.  Finally - don't be too picky about posh varieties - start with things you know will grow because you can see them in other people's gardens.  Small plants tend do do better than bigger ones if you buy from a garden centre - they have less root to start with and will get away faster than big ones which have a lot of top growth to support and will be in potting compost which dries out too quickly.

2014

Posted: 12/02/2014 at 17:20

ages since I've had time to check this site - and had wondered what had happened to you happymarion!  perhaps my quick checks had just been on other topics.  Yes, I too love your pictures and enthusiasm - it's infectious - and hope you have a wonderful golden jubilee year.

I'm afraid I am a hit-and-miss gardener, and believe that where a plant has made an effort it should be rewarded, so do not always take out things when I should.  My venture up the garden to the compost bins amused me as individual crocus plants seem to have popped up all over the grass area near to the winter bed where the real clumps are flowering.  The bulbs are all well into their stride - daffodil buds, hyacinth flowers appearing, snowdrops, primroses and anemone blanda all doing their thing.....but oh dear, I dread to think what damage I am doing as I have no paths in my garden - only beds separated by grassy areas and so soggy!  No sign of flowers on my auriculas yet - they are growing in clay pots - and the birds have all but stripped all the flowers of the mahonias near the house, but then they were grown partly for the birds.

Anemone de Caen

Posted: 12/02/2014 at 16:18

my success rate is also not brilliant - soaking - planting on side - and a lot of hoping for the best, but having said that mine are in flower right now and a bright splash of lurid pink and deep purple makes it all worth while.  my only question would be how deep to plant - I suspect it is far deeper that you would expect.

Orchids

Posted: 12/02/2014 at 16:03

My four plants (all different colours of Phalenopsis) live on a windowsill not in full sunshine.  They get put in a washing up bowl once a week and watered from the top with orchid food, then left to stand in the water for about an hour.  After that they are taken out and water drained out of the pots before being returned to their pot covers.  That's all.  They all flower regularly over long periods of time.  My son (not green fingered) reckons he can cope with the once-a-week regime when I am away for long periods.  Two of the plants were the £4.50 ones that come around in Ikea at regular intervals.  As soon as you move into other species they have differing needs - indeed the English native orchids all need a much damper regime, but then they live outdoors in the garden.

 

Agapanthus

Posted: 11/02/2014 at 19:21

Thank you Bob - great excitement today as I see little green shoots coming up in the indoor flower pot - to wet to see if anything is happening in the greenhouse.  It's always a surprise when self-saved seed of something a tiny bit unusual manages to germinate, but these days I'm prepared to have a go at growing anything that|I can gather seeds from.  I'm sure they will grow on nicely and just wonder now if they will come true to the parent plant which was blue.

Discussions started by gardenning granny

guess who's hiding in my compost bin

Replies: 14    Views: 332
Last Post: 18/08/2014 at 21:39

can anyone ID this plant please?

Replies: 5    Views: 238
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 22:13

seeds for drought resistant meditteranean plants

Replies: 7    Views: 391
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 10:56

huge-wasp-nest-in-the-hedge

how to get rid of it - and then will the wasps return next year 
Replies: 14    Views: 1715
Last Post: 27/07/2014 at 19:26

When can I put the geraniums out?

Replies: 10    Views: 3104
Last Post: 04/10/2013 at 10:36
5 threads returned