London (change)
Today 26°C / 17°C
Tomorrow 27°C / 18°C

gardenning granny


Latest posts by gardenning granny

Layering in a plant pot

Posted: 19/09/2013 at 15:40

You need to keep them somewhere cool until ready to plant.

I planted several pots in layers last year in November, to give as presents, using bulbs from the end of season clearance in the garden centre (amazing value).  Whilst they didn't all flower at the same time, the pots were a mass of colour for several months.  I used city of Harlem hyacinths, jetfire daffodills, chinodoxa and some white crocus, but you can be imaginative when choosing what's left in the GC - just maker sure the bulbs feel plump and solid, and not dry and flaky.

Scary creature Not a plant

Posted: 19/09/2013 at 15:34

I watched this beauty mumching its way through a euphorbia this spring - after a bit of googling it turned out to be the Euphorbia hawk moth!

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/31295.jpg?width=288&height=350&mode=max

 we weatched fascinated for several days, but never saw the final resultant moth!

Snowdrops

Posted: 19/09/2013 at 15:21

I too bought bulbs end of season (november) and planted up, five to a small pot.  Kept in a cold greenhouse but watered after planting they all flowered and were planted out whilst in flower, so that I had them where the spaces were.  The single ones self seed, but the double ones need to be split after 2 or 3 years. 

grown this way you can see where those from previous years are and fill in the gaps where you want them, also you won't haver to wait until next year to buy in the green, thereby missing next springs flowering.  Pots in flower in the garden centre are always expensive, and probably the same bulbs you could be planting up for yourself!

House plants

Posted: 19/09/2013 at 15:12

Have you considered a Clivia?  It tolerates total neglect and mine seems to be in flower virtually all the year round with several big orangy heads of flowers.  I've had to split it after three years, and also amused myself by planting a couple of seeds from the flower head and gained a couple of baby plants.  As I am often away for a month at a time it needs to be pretty self sufficient.....and it is.

Plant identification

Posted: 04/09/2013 at 09:43

what a teaser! can't wait to know what they really are but reckon you're lucky to have them.

Plant identification

Posted: 03/09/2013 at 14:02

liriope muscari?  that flowers in autumn....

Plant identification

Posted: 03/09/2013 at 13:11

they look rather like agapanthus - mine toojk several years to flower - but they look like they have more flower buds down the stem and agapanthus only have one glorious head per stem as far as I know....

How to care for old apple tree

Posted: 03/09/2013 at 12:10

Many old trees are biennial croppers - that is they give a very heavy crop one year, and virtually nothing the next.  I'm lucky, with three very old trees (no idea of variety) when one is cropping heavily the others are "resting" so we always have plenty of fruit to spare.  The extreme weathere of the last few years has upset a lot of old trees though as they have struggles to cope first with waterlogging then with drought.

Perhaps you should just leave it be - and maybe wassail it with s few friends for encouragement!

What's the star in your garden right now

Posted: 03/09/2013 at 12:04

Always a pleasure to read Happy Marions contributions!  Yes the apples on one of my ancient trees are ready for picking - I only wish |I knew what variety they are - but they keep indefinitely. I will start filling my boot with bags of apples to give away - these old trees produce sufficient for the whole village.

My greenhouse is full of grapes too - will have to do a bit of winemaking, methinks.

I also have a vibrant pot of three bright orange and red begonias - bought cheap, planted late, and flowering their socks off - completely outshine the geraniums which are also abundant this year (and that's after flowering all winter in my unheated lobby.)

 

 

Rosemary edible?

Posted: 30/08/2013 at 10:05

....it goe without saying that you pick the newest, youngest growth to eat

Discussions started by gardenning granny

can anyone ID this plant please?

Replies: 5    Views: 210
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 22:13

seeds for drought resistant meditteranean plants

Replies: 7    Views: 324
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 10:56

huge-wasp-nest-in-the-hedge

how to get rid of it - and then will the wasps return next year 
Replies: 13    Views: 1238
Last Post: 30/08/2013 at 22:35

When can I put the geraniums out?

Replies: 10    Views: 2948
Last Post: 04/10/2013 at 10:36
4 threads returned