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Gary Hobson


Latest posts by Gary Hobson

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 11:37

 Happy frogs...

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20132.jpg?width=350

And with their spawn...

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20133.jpg?width=350

There's a recent thread about pond edging. The snap below shows the edge of my pond. The details in the picture are not easy to see. There are irises in the pond, which merge into plants on the land side. The pond edge can't be seen....

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20134.jpg?width=350

The plant in the right foreground, with a mass of roots near the surface, is a pond lily.

 

Fork Handles

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 11:35

I'm on the case....

Slugs

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 06:41
Caz W wrote (see)

...Protect your crops with Copper. Slugs get an electric shock when they touch the shiny metal. ... Drop captured slugs into a jar of pennies and watch ‘em spark!

Is gratuitous sadistic treatment of animials really necessary?

I normally remove slugs by nighttime inspection, and rehome them. But I've actually just bought a packet of nematodes, and also a roll of copper strip. I'm planning to protect some lupins using the nematodes, and some using copper strip, just to see how effective both of those methods are for me,

 

Fork Handles

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 06:22

Morning Deano (and forkers yet to come),

You must have started early, to be taking a break now.

There does seem to have been a change in the forecast. Hard frost had been forecast for tomorrow night, but that now seems to have been cancelled.

I haven't been outside yet. I can hear birds and frogs calling....

Pruning a silver birch

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 06:17

You have nothing to worry about.

I have seen this often in my own garden. I seem to recall the the drip can continue for a very long period, possibly months. The only problem that I'm aware of is that this sticky stuff can drip onto you. It can be almost like rain.

Creating height and also a screen - to keep prying neighbours at bay!

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 06:10

IMO, bamboo makes an excellent screening plant.

You need to get a species that is not invasive, and that has erect stems (that don't flop). Most bamboos are evergreen too. I don't know of a better screening plant, that can be erected almost instantly.

The slight drawback is that bamboos are not cheap, especially if you want to buy a large one, that is already well grown.

Also, have a look at this thread about screening suggestions...

http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/problem-solving/screening/68628.html

 

Gardeners World new season

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 05:59
Jack Farley wrote (see)
Does anybody know the ipad app that Joe Swift uses on the programme

That question has been asked, and answered, earlier on this thread (and on several other threads).....

LeadFarmer wrote (see)

I think the iPad app that Joe was using is called art studio.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/artstudio-for-ipad-draw-paint/id364017607?mt=8

Joe was simply using his tablet to draw a freehand sketch. There was no sophisticated garden design software involved. Alan Titchmarsh used to so something very similar, using a sketchpad and pencils.

Fork Handles

Posted: 18/03/2013 at 16:27

If OH's PC is using the same router, and his connection is OK, then it's unlikely to be the router.

How is OH's PC connected - wirelessly or using a cable.

You ought to have a yellow ethernet cable which can connect any comouter to the hub directly. That's usually very reliable.

Fork Handles

Posted: 18/03/2013 at 09:42

The scent in these, er, materials does have a real value.

By sniffing the material, other canines can detect what the depositing animal ityself had been eating, and so know if there is food in the area.

The scent may be unattractive to us, but, presumably, the scent of a lady fox smells very attractive to male dogs, and conversely. They can't get enough of it.

Old seeds

Posted: 18/03/2013 at 08:22

The length of time for which seeds remain viable depends entirely on how the seeds are stored.

The Kew Seed Bank is designed to keep seeds for hundreds of years. They make sure that the seeds are dry, and store them at -20C...

http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/save-seed-prosper/millennium-seed-bank/saving-seeds-worldwide/saving-seeds-at-the-seed-bank/seeds-in-cold-storage/index.htm

Discussions started by Gary Hobson

New BBC Gardening Show looking for Kitchen Gardeners

Replies: 11    Views: 1612
Last Post: 31/03/2014 at 19:57

Hampton Court Family Garden Competition

You are invited to design a family garden which will be built this year at Hampton Court 
Replies: 8    Views: 972
Last Post: 10/02/2013 at 15:01
2 threads returned