London (change)
Today 13°C / 5°C
Tomorrow 12°C / 6°C

Green Magpie


Latest posts by Green Magpie

1 to 10 of 389

Cat Poo on my raised veg beds

Posted: Yesterday at 16:23

I got one of those solar ultrasonic scarers and it seems to work really well - in fact I went and got another one to protect another part of the garden. I move them around from time to time in order to confound the cats, and to protect whatever seedlings need it most. You can get them on Amazon for about £13.

what licence to sell produce do I get?

Posted: 03/04/2015 at 09:32

As regards planning permission, a slight change of use is OK if it is incidental to the use of the house as a dwelling. If it is more than that, it needs planning permission. But I can't see that being a problem here. Most home "offices", hobby workshops etc would not need permission, unless they are obviously set up mainly to serve a business. Anything involving extra noise, traffic, parking etc is more likely to come to the attention of the planners than clerical/office uses.

what licence to sell produce do I get?

Posted: 02/04/2015 at 21:25

I can't imagine that a domestic garden would produce enough to require planning permission etc.  A bit of produce sold at the gate, a bit more at carboot sales, a bit via your local shop..... that would take care of us much as most gardens could produce. If you end up infringing any regulations, someone will soon tell you! I really wouldn't meet trouble half way by asking the Coucil about trading regulations. You don't want to have to start declaring all your profits for tax, keeping track of all your expenses and outgoings, etc. I say keep it casual and under the radar, unless you really have the makings of a viable business.

how deep rooting are courgettes?

Posted: 31/03/2015 at 22:33

Yes,  I would think courgettes would be fine, also outdoor cucumbers and squashes,  peppers, chillis, peas, beans and salad greens.  It's a bit late to start shallots, but onion sets would be fine. NOT carrots, parsnips , chard or potatoes. Strawberries would be OK too. Some herbs don't mind it being a bit gravelly (thyme, sage, maybe oregano, chives).

Goldfish and tadpoles

Posted: 28/03/2015 at 08:17

We have seen newts go round biting the heads off tadpoles, without bothering to eat them. Perhaps they're trying to reduce the frog population, in order to protect their young. Or maybe they're just vicious little thugs.

Goldfish and tadpoles

Posted: 28/03/2015 at 07:32

Yes, tadpoles like basking in very shallow areas, especially as they're approaching froghood, and most fish won't go where it's too shallow. One the froglets can clamber on to a rock or reach dry land, it's the birds they have to watch out for.

Goldfish and tadpoles

Posted: 27/03/2015 at 22:41

Tadpoles aren't all supposed to grow up - only a small proportion need to survive to ensure that the frog population continues. The rest won't be wasted, they will make a really nutritious treat for your goldfish.

Cat Poo on my raised veg beds

Posted: 20/03/2015 at 22:22

I've just installed a Sonic And Flash animal repeller (Amazon, about £14). It works on rechargeable solar batteries, so doesn't need any cables or connections. Early days yet, but first results are encouraging. If  the poo-free condition of this section of the garden continues, we may invest in another one.

In the short term, orange peel deters cats, which hate the smell.

Three Sisters

Posted: 19/03/2015 at 16:50

I tried a sort of two-sisters thing last year, although there was quite an age gap between the sisters. I grew climbing French beans on a double wigwam, and then planted several  squash seedlings on the ground beneath. The squash were mainly on the sunny side of the beans, so there was no shading problem. Eventually the squashes began to climb the bean canes, but by this stage the beans were harvested, except for those I was growing on for seed. It worked well for me and I intend to do it again.

potatoes

Posted: 18/03/2015 at 19:30

Charlotte are not exactly blight resistant, but although the tops may get blighted and wither, the potatoes themselves (in my experience) are always perfectly OK.  I leave them in the ground, sometimes long after the tops have withered completely, and they're always fine. 

Anything you can do to avoid or delay blight is still worth doing, as the potatoes won't grow much once the tops die back.

1 to 10 of 389

Discussions started by Green Magpie

Leaking squash, help!

Replies: 12    Views: 417
Last Post: 19/08/2014 at 08:57

Moths and lavender

Replies: 0    Views: 220
Last Post: 08/08/2014 at 12:14

Drama in the compost heap

Replies: 5    Views: 349
Last Post: 04/08/2014 at 21:18

Tomato thriving on neglect!

Replies: 5    Views: 404
Last Post: 20/06/2014 at 10:54

Secateurs open?

Replies: 5    Views: 658
Last Post: 06/05/2014 at 21:27

Lobelia for wedding at end of May

Replies: 6    Views: 464
Last Post: 04/06/2014 at 22:39

Flatworms?

Replies: 8    Views: 855
Last Post: 03/02/2014 at 07:50

Runners on new strawberry plants

Replies: 6    Views: 701
Last Post: 29/09/2013 at 08:39

Nettles for butterflies

 
Replies: 10    Views: 1743
Last Post: 22/07/2013 at 14:25

What not to grow

Replies: 25    Views: 1592
Last Post: 31/07/2014 at 18:08

Photinia Red Robin pruning?

Replies: 29    Views: 18134
Last Post: 06/04/2015 at 10:01

Searching the site?

Replies: 17    Views: 2061
Last Post: 04/02/2014 at 15:30
12 threads returned