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Green Magpie


Latest posts by Green Magpie

Witch Hazel

Posted: 29/01/2014 at 13:44

Ours has been established for several years but it is only just beginning to show flowers now, quite a bit later than other years. Several other things are also very behind - our snowdrops and viburnum have hardly shown any flowers at all yet. I think it's to do with the relatively mild but very wet conditions, and I'm sure your witch hazel will come good in the end.

Water Butts

Posted: 29/01/2014 at 13:37

Have a look at the website or printed bumf of your water supplier (no, not Mother Nature, the people who clean up the water and pipe it into your house). They often offer water butts to their local areas and can probably deliver for a reasonable rate.

We ordered one from Dobbies Garden Centre online. They were good value and very helpful, replacing it when it arrived with a crack in it.

christmas parcel

Posted: 20/12/2013 at 08:39

Yes, you have to register with them the first time (I've only used them twice). You can pay by card or by PayPal. They then get you to print out a label (they search the postal database to make sure the address corresponds to the post code) which you attach to the package - this has their bar code on, so you do need to be able to print it out.

Talkback: Front gardens

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 17:51

Yes, if you use gravel or similar material on your parking area, that doesn't (I think) need planning permission, as it allows water to drain away.

A recent edition of the BBC Front Garden programme was all about how to get some stuff growing in limited frontage space, even if you also have a car parked there. They were showing tubs, pots and beds used to brighten up not only gardens/yards but also the areas outside, on the verges and footpaths (not always a feasilbe option but very attractive when it is).

christmas parcel

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 17:45

Forester - yes, My Hermes will collect from a shed or outbuilding etc, and deliver to one as well, if given the details. This is a big help to anyone who's out at work. Obviously if you want a signature on delivery, the recipent needs to be in (and there's an extra charge for this). Ebay now list Hermes as a suggested courier in their drop-down list of postage options, so it seems to be well established.

Badly explained help!

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 17:39

I think I see what you're saying, Bob - do you mean that the soil heats up during the day and then stays warm, like a storage radiator? In which case yes, I suppose there may be some benefit from clustering pots when there are significant fluctuations in temperature between day and night.The soil can radiate heat if the sun has provided it during the day (although not if it's constantly cold).

But I'd imagine that to make the most of this effect, you'd need to un-cluster the pots when the sun is shining, to allow the pots' surfaces to absorb the sun's warmth and heat up the soil. If they do get really cold, they'll take longer to thaw out if they're clustered together, won't they?

Garlic wars!

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 14:44

I think birds sometimes pull them out - they certainly do this with newly planted shallots - in order to peck at the soft earth and beasties underneath. Once the garlic is well established they won't be able to do this, but in the meanitme you can protect it with fleece, netting etc.

christmas parcel

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 14:39

I think the size limits on a "small parcel" have gone up but the weight bands are the same - if it weighs over 1kg you may find cheaper options elsewhere. I respect the Royal Mail and like to support it but I have recently resorted to a certain popular courier firm who will collect from our door or from a named "safe place" and will do the same at the other end - and it's tracked.

Badly explained help!

Posted: 19/12/2013 at 11:11

You're right, though, the advice does rather suggest that the plants can huddle together like sheep or penguins to conserve their body-heat.

I suppose there would be some protection from the cooling effect of frosty winds. But as remarked already, the main benefit would be that youcould then protect the whole cluster with a layer of bubble-wrap or something.

indoor herbs

Posted: 16/12/2013 at 17:21

Basil - yes absolutely, I have some in my kitchen now that's been grwoing for a couple of months since I bought it at a supermarket.

Sage is not generally sold in supermarkets as it's too big and leggy, but if you can get some established out of doors, it's hardy and you can use it in the winter. Or if you get a sprig or two, you can dry or freeze the leaves.

Discussions started by Green Magpie

Leaking squash, help!

Replies: 12    Views: 278
Last Post: 19/08/2014 at 08:57

Moths and lavender

Replies: 0    Views: 104
Last Post: 08/08/2014 at 12:14

Drama in the compost heap

Replies: 5    Views: 235
Last Post: 04/08/2014 at 21:18

Tomato thriving on neglect!

Replies: 5    Views: 295
Last Post: 20/06/2014 at 10:54

Secateurs open?

Replies: 5    Views: 466
Last Post: 06/05/2014 at 21:27

Lobelia for wedding at end of May

Replies: 6    Views: 341
Last Post: 04/06/2014 at 22:39

Flatworms?

Replies: 8    Views: 694
Last Post: 03/02/2014 at 07:50

Runners on new strawberry plants

Replies: 6    Views: 578
Last Post: 29/09/2013 at 08:39

Nettles for butterflies

 
Replies: 10    Views: 1411
Last Post: 22/07/2013 at 14:25

What not to grow

Replies: 25    Views: 1343
Last Post: 31/07/2014 at 18:08

Photinia Red Robin pruning?

Replies: 25    Views: 14710
Last Post: 06/06/2014 at 22:33

Searching the site?

Replies: 17    Views: 1875
Last Post: 04/02/2014 at 15:30
12 threads returned