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Green Magpie


Latest posts by Green Magpie

Homegrown Wedding Flowers

Posted: 01/09/2014 at 09:39

Most of those mentioned will germinate out of doors in a seed bed, but you'll get more reliable results if you start them off indoors in seed trays, and you'll be less at the mercy of our variable seasons.

You might be able to find space  for seed trays somewhere in the house (conservatory? windowsill?) or in a garage or shed if you can arrange a place with enough light.  Once the seeds are germinated, you should be able to plant them outdoors or tranfer them to pots or modules until they get a bit bigger. These would probably be OK in a sheltered corner of the garden. The seed packets will give you more detail on when and how to plant. If you do need a dedicated space, those plastic mini-greenhouse are probably the cheapest way. Or find a friend with a greenhouse?

Don't be afraid to have a fallback plan. For a start, remember that you can buy trays of seedlings ready to plant out. This year my sweet pea seeds didn't germinate so I bought a tray of a dozen little plants from the local shop, which romped away and gave a  lovely display. They're still home grown, all you're doing is let someone start them off for you.

And if even that fails,  a few bunches of cut flowers from your local market or supermarket can always be bought at the last minute to top up. Another way of cheating is to keep an eye on other people's gardens - I've just let a neighbour cut some of my blue hydrangeas for wedding decorations in the church.

And please do let us know how it all goes!

Homegrown Wedding Flowers

Posted: 31/08/2014 at 17:45

If you can get cornflowers to bloom by then, there's nothing to match their deep, clear blue. Or  Love-in-a-mist (nigella) is pretty. Lavender should be in bloom then and can add scent and colour, but you can't grow it from seed in a season.Maybe you can find a friend with a lavender bush?

At our daughter's  wedding we made all the buttonholes and corsages for the main wedding party and several guests too. If you get the proper florist's tape and wire, it's really not difficult. If you want to know more about this, just ask me. We did buy some flowers - cream rosebuds from a supermarket - and added other stuff from gardens, plus pretty ribbons etc. 

Chilli peppers

Posted: 30/08/2014 at 22:19

I've tried both drying and freezing them, and prefer the frozen ones on the whole. The dried ones look prettyvat first but they soon lose their colour, and then you might as well just crush them up to store in a jar. Frozen ones can be used like fresh ones in cooking, and are actually easier to chop when they're still frozen. I still have some in the freezer from two years ago - just as well last year's crop was a failure.

Recently we won a raffle prize of - guess what? - a gift pack with a bottle of chilli sauce, chilli salt and ground chillis.  

Did I review 1500 plants in my sleep?

Posted: 29/08/2014 at 20:50

I have sent a message to the web team asking what is going on. Suggest others do the same.

Did I review 1500 plants in my sleep?

Posted: 29/08/2014 at 20:45

How bizarre! I appear to have reviewed over 1500 plants too, including some I've never heard of.

Tomatoes. Do I have the dreaded lurgey?

Posted: 22/08/2014 at 10:10

It's safe to eat any of the fruit that looks Ok, but it probably won't store.

leek moth

Posted: 22/08/2014 at 10:08

I am pretty sure that the moth ceases activity in the winter and that the leeks are safe without protection then. 

Mildew

Posted: 20/08/2014 at 20:11

I was reading yesterday that it's been a particularly bad year for mildew. It also affects some well established plants, not just newly planted ones. They say that well watered plants are better able to resist it, but on the other hand the spores spread best in warm, dry weather. Keeping your plants well watered but dry is a bit of a black art!

Leaking squash, help!

Posted: 19/08/2014 at 08:57

Yup, been there, done that! As they say, it's not about the winning, and it certainly isn't about the loot (£1 for a first, 80p for a second...). but it does give my great satisfaction to make a small profit on my entry fees, and to know I've contributed to a lively local event.

 

Leaking squash, help!

Posted: 17/08/2014 at 07:59

I never decide until the week of the show, but my carrots and courgettes always do well. My French beans are good but this year they're all over too early, likewise my spuds which have not cropped well. Sometimes my very blue hydrangea gets a prize but there are always bigger ones and this year there was stiff competition. There are several floral art classes, which had very few entries this year - I made a corsage which got second prize out of .....two. So that's always worth a go if I can put up with the humiliation of getting a prize for coming last!

Discussions started by Green Magpie

Leaking squash, help!

Replies: 12    Views: 282
Last Post: 19/08/2014 at 08:57

Moths and lavender

Replies: 0    Views: 106
Last Post: 08/08/2014 at 12:14

Drama in the compost heap

Replies: 5    Views: 237
Last Post: 04/08/2014 at 21:18

Tomato thriving on neglect!

Replies: 5    Views: 296
Last Post: 20/06/2014 at 10:54

Secateurs open?

Replies: 5    Views: 468
Last Post: 06/05/2014 at 21:27

Lobelia for wedding at end of May

Replies: 6    Views: 342
Last Post: 04/06/2014 at 22:39

Flatworms?

Replies: 8    Views: 694
Last Post: 03/02/2014 at 07:50

Runners on new strawberry plants

Replies: 6    Views: 581
Last Post: 29/09/2013 at 08:39

Nettles for butterflies

 
Replies: 10    Views: 1417
Last Post: 22/07/2013 at 14:25

What not to grow

Replies: 25    Views: 1345
Last Post: 31/07/2014 at 18:08

Photinia Red Robin pruning?

Replies: 25    Views: 14717
Last Post: 06/06/2014 at 22:33

Searching the site?

Replies: 17    Views: 1879
Last Post: 04/02/2014 at 15:30
12 threads returned