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greenjude


Latest posts by greenjude

31 to 40 of 40

Talkback: Unpleasant plant smells

Posted: 22/06/2012 at 00:47

I had a lily in the house once. After a weekend away, as soon as I opened the door I thought something had died and was decomposing. It took me ages searching for a corpse to work out it was the lily. When I put it outside, it's scent was lovely, but indoors it was way too pungent.

scaredy cat plant, does it work

Posted: 22/06/2012 at 00:36

My neighbour's cats don't seem bothered by it. On the other hand, it has a lovely blue flower spike! You'd need several in the area the cats use - fine in the veg patch but not everywere. I think they smell of fox, so I'm hoping they keep rabbits at bay. They root very easily, so one or two plants would provide quite a lot quickly

Help identifying plants.

Posted: 23/04/2012 at 16:10

Hi Bonnie

Plant 2 looks very much like Dizigotheca elegantissima, also known as Aralia elegantissima, and it's definitely an indoor plant! It tends to be fussy too - hates waterlogging but will drop it's leaves if it gets too dry, and is a martyr to red spider mite and scale insect. Not that I want to put you off, as it's a lovely plant! When it gets big, the leaves are coarser and less interesting, but I can guarantee you won't get that far. If it starts looking tatty or infested, you can cut it hard back and it will reshoot. It would probably be healthier outdoors in summer and certainly less pest-prone, but definitely not hardy.

I agree with the others that plant 1 looks like a Hellebore. Plant 3 looks like lots of plants!

Talkback: Feeding garden birds

Posted: 09/02/2012 at 20:15
Very good advice, Kate, but it isn't always practical to move the feeders, especially in a small garden. I move mine back and forth about 1½m but I'm not sure that's far enough to make much difference. I'm considering regularly removing the top layer of soil (with grass, weeds and sprouted seeds!) and replacing with soil from elsewhere, or putting paving slabs under the feeders that I can clean.

Orchids

Posted: 09/02/2012 at 19:56

Wow! Your posts are always a delight but these are gorgeous. No wonder you're Happy, Marion!

Ivy or not?

Posted: 09/02/2012 at 19:54

peterpest57

If you cut it at ground level the topgrowth will die and then it pulls off easily. If you then want to kill it, it'll be a lot easier to spray the new growth than spray a wall-full. Admittedly, this way you'll have shrivelling ivy on the wall for some weeks until it's dead enough to pull, but you'll do far less damage to the wall and it's far less work. Have you ever tried spraying a wall? You'll get more spray on yourself that the ivy!

Ground Elder

Posted: 09/02/2012 at 19:44

My sympathies are with you. I've dug up enough to start a cottage industry if only I could find a use for it, and there's plenty left! Glyphosate will do it but it may take 2 or even 3 goes. But you need to tackle the source. You could offer to spray your neighbours' weeds too if they don't want to do it themselves. Otherwise, a physical barrier along the boundary like heavy-duty polythene to a depth of about 22cm/9 inches would work if the boundary is short enough to make this practical. And constant vigilance - it's very persistent! Or maybe a narrow strip along the boundary that you can keep an eye on and spray as and when. I don't like using chemicals but glyphosate breaks down to carbon dioxide and water on contact with soil so should be safe and is useful for spot-killing. I keep the top half of a plastic drink bottle (2 litre) to spray through, to avoid spraying my precious plants. Woody shrub stems aren't affected by glyphosate so shrubs along the edge might help, as long as you keep it off the leaves.

Hope this helps and good luck.

Welcome to the garden design forum

Posted: 22/12/2011 at 22:09

Hi Steve. That's a very exposed site you have there. Yew is tough as old boots and will thrive as long as your ground isn't waterlogged. I'd suggest planting it on the leeward side of your fence, then remove the fence once the yew has really got going. It's often considered slow-growing, but I've found it is slow for the first year, like most trees, while it's getting its roots well established. After that, it will grow quite quickly. One thing to watch though: make sure it has reasonable air circulation between it and the fence. Otherwise, it will grow a funny shape and you may get fungal infections. The beauty of yew, unlike most conifers, is that you can cut it really severely if it grows the wrong way, and will happily regenerate from old wood. Apart from waterlogging, they're hard to kill!

Olive Trees

Posted: 22/12/2011 at 21:54

I had a small olive tree in a 10cm pot  which sat outside all last winter. Admittedly my garden was buried under a cosy blanket of deep snow for weeks, but it went down to -16C. My olive came through it with barely a leaf lost. They're tougher than you think. Still, if you can protect the roots it would help the plant. You really don't need to coddle the top growth, unless it has been grown soft this year and isn't well hardened by now. Just wrap the pot in bubble wrap and leave the top growth open, so no sweating in mild spells. Let's hope we have some mild spells!

Begonia dryadis

Posted: 22/12/2011 at 21:41

Hi folks

Happy Solstice! The days are getting longer!

I was given a rhyzome of Begonia dryadis in the Plant Exchange of Plant Heritage (NCCPG). It did nothing all summer but has now decided to sprout. (Good job I'm too untidy and disorganised to throw things out.) However, the first leaf collapsed and died, but another is now showing. I can find nothing in my refenrence books or online about how to care for this plant. As it's rare, I'm especially keen to keep it alive. Does anyone know what I should do? It spent the summer in a greenhouse and is now indoors. I have about 20 different Begonias so I'm not new to them.

31 to 40 of 40

Discussions started by greenjude

Plastic packages for posted plants

Replies: 9    Views: 506
Last Post: 01/03/2013 at 13:59

Begonia dryadis

plant requirements 
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Last Post: 22/12/2011 at 21:41
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