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happymarion


Latest posts by happymarion

Summer has arrived

Posted: 24/06/2013 at 20:16

Yesterday the Bristol Group of the Alpine Garden Society had its summer outing to The Stone House Cottage Garden and John Massey's garden at Ashwood Nurseries where the gardeners themselves gave us a guided tour.  i was blown away by the beautiful colours in both  These ir

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26193.jpg?width=472&height=350&mode=max

 

ises will be my next water colour task.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 19/06/2013 at 19:20

So lovely, Wintersong.  I have been snapping two things that are pertect companions colourwise in my garden - blue bearded iris and heuchera "Caramel".

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25828.jpg?width=374&height=350&mode=max

 

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What is this little tree..?

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 13:42

Yes, maple family.  CP if you need us to see details by clicking the photograph you must make sure your pic is no more than 1000kbs.  When we saw the trunk then of course it was a tree, not a heuchera!

Summer has arrived

Posted: 16/06/2013 at 22:24

Singy the red and white Sweet William are the first to flower of my mant clumps of them because they are in a corner of one of my raised beds which are warmer than my borders.  In July you will see them in all hues round the garden in my pictures.  They are so easy if you treat them as perennials and keep sticking cuttings straight in the ground.  I started with a packet of seed aout ten years ago.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 16/06/2013 at 18:50

That is the flower of my elder tree.  It is covered in them.  I could make a fortune in elderflower cordial.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 16/06/2013 at 10:28

Only the middle of June and i took my camera in fear and trepidation up the garden after the horrific winds and heavy rain we had in Bristol yeasterday.  I was lucky only one pale blue bearded iris had been blown down and a few dead branches.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25618.jpg?width=317&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25619.jpg?width=248&height=350&mode=max

 

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Painting what you've grown

Posted: 15/06/2013 at 16:00

And she was 104 and older probably than everything in the garden.  Gilly L that has the tears running down my cheeks .  Eddie, I love the sqirrels and all your imaginative finds!

Allium paradoxum

Posted: 15/06/2013 at 14:47

Why not divide your allium paradoxum bulbs into two - plant half in the garden and the rest in a pot.  Label the pot and you then have a reminder of the early flowering small white allium which will appear next year in the garden.

Painting what you've grown

Posted: 15/06/2013 at 14:43

I hope the Prime Minister reads that.  Gardening came a long time before politics.  The Bible sites the Garden of Eden as where human life first began.  You cannot get more recommendation than that.  Hee is another of my poems with a gardening theme.

 

Out in the Cold.

 

As you would for a rare mountain plant,

You put me in the Alpine House;

Studied my history, my habitat,

My preferences for food and drink.

 

Seeing that I was thriving,

You moved me to the rock garden 

Of marriage.

There I put down roots

And did what alpines love to do,

Blossomed spectacularly,

And bred seven new rarities for you.

 

Now you are gone,

I struggle in the neglected garden

Of widowhood.

Longing to be back in the Alpine House.

Yet adapted enough 

To survive on the mountain.

Painting what you've grown

Posted: 15/06/2013 at 09:39

He said it did not need much academic ability or something similar to be a horticultualist,  Alan Titchmarsh took it up in high dudgeon and argued the case well in several papers and magazines.  The fact that many schools are now having gardening clubs and bringing their children to the Botanic Garden makes me think teachers do not agree with him.  The children who visit the Bristol Botanic Garden cannot help get a large dose of science (evolutionary dell and pollinarion garden, medicinal plants, useful plants like vanilla for ice-cream, chocolate, tea and coffee and bananas, rare and native local plants to make their walks round Bristol more interesting.Plants that grow in Medieterranean climates in case global warming changes our weather that way in the future).  I feel safer knowing children can be educated in such things as the threat of much dearer food for my grandchildren is very real.  I was horrified by what the Prime Minister said.  He has children too.

Discussions started by happymarion

Talkback: Trees for wildlife

Well done, Kate. Last winter was so mild and wet lots of sickly trees suddenly showed what they are made of. Trees and shrubs that had nev... 
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The "Charlotte" potatoes I an trialling for Mr. Fothergill are harvested from the potato planter bag and being eaten. very delicious and a ... 
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Talkback: Growing tomatoes outdoors

Growing tomatoes indoors and out is a trial the Nation of Gardeners Project is doing for Mr. Fothergill Seeds. Ferline F1 is included in th... 
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I have three gems of tomatoes to sow as a participant in Mr. fothergills Trials in the nation of Gardeners project, called "Black Opal". "Pi... 
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2014

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My acer seedlings from the Botanic Garden which I weeded are all different colouring - salmon pink, rich toffee, crimson. pale pink and a ve... 
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an unlabeled gift of a clematis in need of a name. 
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Celebrating the warm colours of autumn 
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One of my birthday presents was Kalanchoe "Bronze Sculpture" which is commonly known as the Paddle plant but this one has bronze colored tip... 
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Painting what you've grown

Letting other people see what can be done to immortalise your plants. 
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Last Post: 16/06/2013 at 17:10

Summer has arrived

Let's share the lovely flowers and veg. in our gardens this summer. 
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picture difficulties

SOS 
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Awww, it was the same for my sister gardening in Edmonton in Canada, James. It was amazing how much they could grow in their very short thr... 
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Spring sweethearts

The sun shone brightly enough for my tulips to open up,something that thrills me every spring. 
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Spring Spectacular

The Garden Sculpture Exhibition at the Bristol Botanic Garden  
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