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Hester Scott


Latest posts by Hester Scott

cancer has meant I can't manage my garden

Posted: 07/08/2014 at 22:58

Trudi.  Sounds like you are quite down, and no wonder.  Just remember there will be many people wanting to help you, and by allowing them to do so, you will be helping them.  We all know how great it is to be asked to do something when someone is needing it.  Just don't get stressed and exhausted over it all.  Plants and gardens are resilient, they can wait!  Love to you.

Screen at front wall

Posted: 07/08/2014 at 08:09

Any white hydrangea.  I have Annabelle out at the moment and it is wonderful.  The paniculata ones are beautiful too.  They blend in with their neighbours and the landscape. 

What the experts get wrong

Posted: 06/08/2014 at 23:06

One area of changing attitudes is that of clearing up the garden.  Weeds, leaves, etc were cleared away and usually burnt.  Now we are encouraged to leave old dead growth on perennials overwinter and leaves uncollected for bugs and frogs and the like to live and proliferate.

im just waiting for some influential pundit to start telling us to pot up what we think of now as weeds and prize them as the new ecological pot plants.  Actually many of them are fabulous.  And cheap.  Betcha it's going to happen!

What the experts get wrong

Posted: 05/08/2014 at 23:10

Advice changes just as fashions change.  One thing I query is the oft trotted out gem - pick vegetables young and small.  Well, I don't want a hulking great marrow, so ok about courgettes, but, really,  broad beans!  Who wants them tiny, wet and lacking in taste.  Mine are big, floury and strongly flavoured.  Ok, tough skinned and very few of them, unfortunately, but worth it.  I can hear people muttering about young peas, but no.  Don't want my vegetables sweet.  That's pudding in my book!

A Senior Moment.

Posted: 05/08/2014 at 22:48

Oh, how reassuring to read these.  I spend ages hunting for mislaid things, just hate keys tho I'm obsessed by them. I am unable to throw any out so have bags full of ancient yales chubbs, whatever.  Might need just that key one day.  I think I might have been a warder in a previous life, but my brother in law thinks I was a jailer.  Strangely I have no difficulty remembering plant names.  

Cutting down perennials for a second crop of flowers

Posted: 04/08/2014 at 19:55

I read somewhere, possibly here, that cutting back dehiniums and lupins hard shortens their life.  Probably, but they were wonderful this year but now look like enormous green hulks.  Not much else to come as they took up so much space.  Called putting all your delphiniums in one basket!

plant I don't have but would love

Posted: 31/07/2014 at 08:25

In a garden open to the public here in Dublin there is a wonderful planting on a big scale of a good definite pink dierama growing through a lime green fennel or dill. Purely inspired combination. 

Get if off your chest.

Posted: 29/07/2014 at 07:42

Being only able to find one shoe.  I would rather find no shoes than one shoe.  

Seedling Unknown

Posted: 25/07/2014 at 23:14

I would think a hydrangea.

i hate flies!

Posted: 24/07/2014 at 22:31

I blame the horrid big flies on my cat.  They zoom in to lay their wretched eggs on his unbeaten food.  It only takes minutes sometimes.  Also they smell any trace of the dead mice he brings in.  Not a very sophisticated look these days, but if you can find those old fashioned fly papers to hang up they will put paid to some of them.

Discussions started by Hester Scott

What the experts get wrong

Replies: 27    Views: 564
Last Post: 06/08/2014 at 23:12

Talkback: Garden pests

For the first time ever I'm considering giving up my allotment, as I have never had a year like it. I must have sown or transplanted peas a... 
Replies: 21    Views: 735
Last Post: 29/06/2014 at 08:16
2 threads returned