hypercharleyfarley


Latest posts by hypercharleyfarley

Identify this plant/fruit/nut

Posted: 26/08/2016 at 17:14

I think it's wisteria.  They usually look like fuzzy runner bean pods but it would appear that only one of the flowers on the raceme actually set seed, rather than lots of them.

Last edited: 26 August 2016 17:17:07

ID please!

Posted: 04/08/2016 at 21:55

Thanks again Obs - looks like a bit of a challenge, and I bet the bunnies probably like the taste too............oh well, something to try one day when I move to another house!

Last edited: 04 August 2016 21:55:43

ID please!

Posted: 04/08/2016 at 21:32

Gosh that was quick!  Thank you both.  Is it hard to maintain - or are there other reasons why it's something relatively unusual, round here at least?


The Monkey Puzzle in this particular place is planted quite some distance from the house and can't be seen from any of the windows!  I rather like it in that particular (large and walled) garden.


Thank again!      HCF

ID please!

Posted: 04/08/2016 at 21:18

Sorry no photo available - no camera with me when I saw this plant. 


Has upright/vertical quite narrow grass-type leaf growth, and what appear at first sight to be seed-heads but which develop into bell-shaped flowers,  hanging down at intervals from the stem.  Bright pink flowers, similar in size and shape to those of a foxglove.


Overall height of leaf growth approx. 3ft - thin and very flexible flowering stems an additional 2ft in height.  The flowers hang individually from small stems approx. 3 inches long.  Several flowers on each of the long  (flowering) stems.  . 


Looks amazing when blowing about in the breeze!  Never seen anything like it - not even in a book - the garden where I saw this plant is very overgrown, but because of the existing plants it was obviously created by a keen gardener. Within the garden itself is very long-established Chilean Pine tree - the largest I've ever seen.


Anybody got any ideas about this mystery plant?

horrible little fox

Posted: 26/07/2016 at 19:12

No need to worry about a confrontation. The fox would run a mile - or several!

horrible little fox

Posted: 26/07/2016 at 18:39

It'll be far more scared of you! They can climb and jump quite high if they really want to, so it's not always easy to make any garden "fox-proof".  Two slightly annoying /worrying things about them are


a) they often have mange which can affect domestic pets such as dogs, and


b) fox poo is sticky and smells awful, and dogs seem to love rolling in it.

Deers

Posted: 24/07/2016 at 14:00

Do you know what type of deer it is?  From what you've said so far it sounds as though it might well be Muntjak, which are spreading all over the UK now - they are solitary deer rather than herd animals.  Because they're quite small I don't think they can jump very high, and they probably push their way into your garden through gaps in the hedging. 


If it is a Muntjak, the chances are you can keep it out by using strong stock netting - the type which is made from wire (a mixture of squares/rectangles rather than hexagon shapes) - and this is easily obtained from fencing suppliers.  It's straightforward to install and only.needs the kind of posts which - when put in - leave around 4ft above ground level.

Independence Day?

Posted: 01/07/2016 at 19:04
Dovefromabove says:

I think that a huge part of the problem nowadays is the widening gap between the rich and poor in the UK.  


The life style and life experience of a pretty large portion of society is a long way removed from that of the rest of the country, and it has been proved that social mobility nowadays is getting worse rather than better. This has lead to a large 'underclass' who feel totally alienated .......... in the past in other countries  this has lead to revolution .... 


See original post

I don't think the gap is really so very different from how it was in the not-so-recent past.  The difference is that people now feel more confident/arrogant (choose whichever suits!) because of relatively recent legislation etc which protects workers' rights and so on.  It's less than a century since women were enfranchised - not exactly insignificant - and because of modern-day communication, rebelliousness can grow and possibly become uncontrolled far faster than was the case only a few decades ago. 

Not a totally bad thing, but - like many other issues - there are what you could call "pros" and "cons" -  as always!

 

Independence Day?

Posted: 01/07/2016 at 12:57

It's easy to forget that we're using this forum because we're interested in gardening - a minority of the population really.  I reckon I'm perhaps reasonably familiar with this because I meet lots of people during the course of my work for an estate agent and what most of them seem to want is at least two off-road parking spaces rather than a garden. If they have children, they just seem to want enough space for a trampoline, and an astonishing proportion of them can't even distinguish between weeds and what they'd call "plants".  Most recent example was a house viewer/prospective purchaser who had brought his mother with him to look at a rather expensive house down a country lane.  He had to ask her what the "white flowers" were in the boundary hedge.  ...................  it was a hawthorn hedge.

Independence Day?

Posted: 01/07/2016 at 12:27
punkdoc says:

Results of presidential election in Austria, have just been annulled.


A precedent?


See original post

Don't think so. Apparently the Court decision was made because of irregularities regarding the "count" - postal votes being opened before voting day, people "signing off" things which they hadn't actually seen, and so on. I think I read somewhere that the majority was only around 30,000 so calls for a re-count in this case might be seen to be valid.

 

Discussions started by hypercharleyfarley

ID please!

looks like a cross between grass and foxglove 
Replies: 6    Views: 306
Last Post: 04/08/2016 at 22:21
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