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hypercharleyfarley


Latest posts by hypercharleyfarley

bird box

Posted: 04/04/2013 at 20:24

I think you probably need to wait at least a couple of years before you can be sure there'll be no residents!  As Bob has already said, some birds are definitely territorial and this will make a difference.  The size of the entry-hole will dictate to some extent which species will be interested. I think it's probably just as important to make sure that the site doesn't get direct sunlight, & isn't exposed to driving rain & cold winds.  Probably a good idea to make sure that any rainwater which falls on to the box won't drip down over the side with the access hole - so a box with a sloping "roof" & the box itself then fixed at a slight downward angle would probably be best.

Using the back button

Posted: 02/04/2013 at 19:27

I think you can get round the problem for now by clicking on "latest posts" instead.

The first Gardeners' World

Posted: 24/03/2013 at 18:44

I think what Obs says makes a lot of sense - and I'm sorry if I upset/annoyed you, DK - but there are always going to be aspects of the TV programme which irritate all or some of us at any one time.  If it's Monty and his greenhouse this time for David, it was Joe with that i-pad (or whatever it was) that irritated me!

 

p.s. I really do respect your knowledge & opinions, DK, but can't always agree with you about everything!  Ma. 

Rubbish/recycling

Posted: 24/03/2013 at 12:46

The recycling thing here has been handled very poorly by the council - for many years after the advent of wheelie-bins we were told that although almost everyone else had them, those of us who live down this lane could not.  The reason was said to be that the lane is too narrow for the lorry.  So, whilst others had their wheelie bins, we still had to leave our waste stuff out on the lane in plastic bags - by 7 am on collection day - and the bags were, of course, raided by foxes and crows/magpies etc long before the council lorry got anywhere near.  Recycled stuff (not glass) was collected on alternate weeks.  We had to take any glass either to a bottle bank or to the local tip ourselves.  Three years ago the council suddenly changed its mind and, although the lorry was the same one and the lane the same width, we were supplied with three wheelie bins per property.  This time we were able to recycle glass too, and this was collected on alternate weeks.

All seemed to be going fine - until last year when it was announced that Everything Was Going to be Changed.  The council said they would collect and recycle the old bins (which to date they have not) and would issue each household with a new wheelie bin, two lidded re-cycling boxes and a "caddy" for waste food which - they say - is going to be turned into bio-fuel.  They won't now allow us to put plastic bags in the re-cycling bins, nor dark-coloured plastic food trays - even though they have the "recyclable"  symbol.  So, I have to take plastic bags "to the nearest large supermarket" but I can recycle (via the new system) mobile phones, computer printer ink cartridges and spectacles.  Some idiot somewhere in the council offices presumably thinks I have loads of those items to recycle each week and don't have any recyclable plastic bags at all..........

 

So - I now have four wheelie bins, two re-cycling boxes and a "caddy".  My council tax has gone up again.  Wonder why................

The first Gardeners' World

Posted: 24/03/2013 at 12:28

Well said, Dove!

Good Morning - 21 March

Posted: 21/03/2013 at 08:56

Hi Obs - probably going to re-pot/rescue some stuff, firstly the contents of two cube-shaped thingys which have disintegrated due - I suppose - to prolonged soaking rain + frost.  I hadn't expected them (the containers) to be prone to frost damage so was surprised when they simply fell apart a couple of weeks ago.  Made from some sort of plastic-based material I think - look like lead at first glance.............. not so durable tho' !

What to grow on a one acre site?

Posted: 20/03/2013 at 18:39

One acre isn't enough for a horse or pony- and even if the OP's two acres were adjacent (but I think he's implied they aren't) that still wouldn't be enough.  There are - sadly - only too many folks who buy their "Little Princess" (ugh!) a pony without any knowledge or previous experience whatsoever, and I see the results more often than you might think.  Buying just single acre plots isn't always a good idea unless you live nearby and can take advantage of that proximity - however, just because you own a piece of land, it doesn't mean you can always do exactly what you want with it, as an earlier thread this month showed.

The Christmas tree idea is one which does work - and there can be some income  every year because people don't always want a big Christmas tree!  I've noticed that the one or two local growers spend the weekends from mid-November onwards on site and cut the trees as required when a customer turns up - they don't sell to any "middle man" so get the full amount for themselves.  This means that not all the trees are removed each year, leading to the need for some replacements of course, but also to a variety of sizes growing on the site &  which is what the customer often likes to choose from.

 

 

What to grow on a one acre site?

Posted: 19/03/2013 at 20:32

I think your idea about Christmas trees is probably the best - I'm guessing you may have seen that people do grow them in that part of the country, with some success.  Growing anything else a fair way from where you live has two disadvantages, as far as I can see. One is that you won't be close by to see what's going on ref possible vandalism/theft etc if you decide to grow fruit/and or vegetables, and the other is that you'd need to factor in any transport & travel costs which could be considerable if you take on anything that needs constant attention.  I think that as far as Christmas trees are concerned, some people do monitor their sites in the weeks leading up to Christmas, as theft is something which, unfortunately, does occur.  You can get battery operated CCTV these days, which might be worth considering, especially as it would only need to be operational for a few weeks in the year.

What about a seperate section for absolute beginers.

Posted: 16/03/2013 at 20:51

Hi Brian - Chica's suggestions could get you started - could you tell us how you first began with your allotment?   Were you the first in your family to do this, or did you copy what your own family had done before?  What's been your favourite thing - what's been the most successful, & have you had any dismal failures?  Is there anything you've tried to grow & then thought "never again"?  What would you sugggest for someone who's just starting out?

 

There are lots of people who "lurk" on these kind of websites and read the posts before actually joining in - it doesn't mean your advice and suggestions wouldn't be read by loads of people who might be a bit wary of starting to ask questions themselves but would like to hear about what people are doing.

Best and worst

Posted: 15/03/2013 at 13:06

The field beyond is mine too - but I rent it out to my farmer neighbour and he looks after that bit!

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