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Italophile


Latest posts by Italophile

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Few flowers on tomotoes

Posted: Yesterday at 06:31

Fishy, watering every day is way too much unless they're in smaller pots, in full sun all day, and it's mighty hot. Few plants like wet feet and toms aren't one of them.

If the plants are in pots, you can afford to let the soil dry out between waterings. Within reason, obviously. The surface of the soil might seem dry but there can be moisture underneath where the roots are. If in doubt, stick a finger as deep into the soil as you can.

An even better test is to monitor the foliage. If it's droopy during the warmth of the day, wait till the sun goes down. If it's still droopy, water. If the foliage perks up, they're okay.

Less is better with tomatoes - water, fertiliser, everything. They're tough plants that do best with "controlled neglect".

Supermarket tomato sprouting

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 17:00

Ah, I see, I think. The reference to pollination by another tomato flower probably refers to the tomato being a hybrid variety. Seeds from a hybrid won't grow true to type.

Supermarket tomato sprouting

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 16:52

So it can't be a result of self-pollination?

Supermarket tomato sprouting

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 15:15

Good grief. You'd have to think the tom has been stored for too long at too warm a temperature. Ye the skin of the tomato doesn't seem to have deteriorated as it would in that situation.

Few flowers on tomotoes

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 11:44

The side shoot will more than likely develop into a growing tip. Wait and see what happens.

Blight

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 11:43

And melon and cucumber leaves are prone to diseases like mildew, particularly if the foliage gets wet during watering. 

Moving my tomatoes

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 11:01

I'm with Blue Dragon, although tomato roots are very sturdy things and can take handling. Even mishandling. I've transplanted a few fruiting plants in my time, transferring from the ground into pots and vice versa.

Wait for the coolest part of the day, take all care, and don't expose the transplant to any direct sun for at least a couple of days. And, as Blue Dragon says, water well.

 

Supermarket tomato sprouting

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 10:52

I've never seen it but I recall it being posted about here before. Inside the tomato, the seeds are coated in a greeny-yellowy gel. It's a naturally-occurring germination inhibitor designed to stop exactly what has happened. It's also the gel that has to be rinsed off if you're saving seeds to grow next season. 

It's likely that for whatever reason, maybe a genetic glitch, the inhibitor has broken down somehow.

beefstake tomatoes

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 10:42

NM, beefsteaks are, by definition, on the larger side so there aren't many fast-maturing varieties. They usually take 70 days or longer from planting out to maturity and that's in prime conditions, prolonged warm weather, etc.

I have half a dozen beefsteak varieties in the ground. 70 days from planting out ticked over the other day. Seriously warm weather has only hit here in the last month - very high 20s into the mid-30s - and the first beefsteak is probably another 10 days away from maturity.

How long is your viable growing season?

Blight

Posted: 05/07/2015 at 10:30

And if a decision is made to spray, the spray has to be preventive, before the first symptoms of infection appear. Spraying after their appearance is pretty much a waste of time.

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