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Italophile


Latest posts by Italophile

Talkback: Tomato blight

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 10:41
Glyn Hodges wrote (see)
Having lost all of my outdoor tomato plants this year through "Blight" should the ground be treated before trying again next year, and, if so, what with and when?
Help appreciated. Thanks.

Glyn, common tomato fungal problems - Early Blight, Septoria Leaf Spot, etc - aren't soil-related. The spores travel in the air. Some of the spores will fall from the leaves to the soil during the season, but, as I posted above, you can turn over the soil and bury them. Any of the same fungal problems that turn up next year will arrive through the air.

The blight that attacks both toms and potatoes is Late Blight. Late Blight spores, unusually, don't live on in the soil on their own. They only remain an ongoing problem if infected toms - or potatoes - are left lying around.

There is, though, as Phil says, an argument for not planting in the same ground in successive years. There are some diseases - mainly viral - that can live on in the soil.

Greenhouse after tomato blight

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 10:31

Great idea to grow outdoors if you can, Phil. Greenhouses can be incubators for so many fungal problems for toms.

Asparagus Seedlings

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 09:14

Sounds fine. I prefer them in the ground, that's all. The only time I used pots, the pots weren't big enough. I was a dill.

 

Pruning Lemon Tree

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 06:58

They can take up to 10 years or more, Flangie, with no guarantee they will fruit.

Asparagus Seedlings

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 06:48

Where did you plant them, Hayley? They would be better off in the ground, cut back in winter, mulched for protection, transplanted into the asparagus bed next spring.

New site - bugs

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 06:12

I got notification of that post, Bev. Seems to be working at the moment for me. But we'll see.

Squash

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 22:19

The ones that aren't swelling probably weren't pollinated or pollinated properly. They usually shrivel up and fall off.

Talkback: Growing herbs

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 16:57
nikki2 wrote (see)
I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO GROW HERBS IN POTS IN MY KITCHEN WITHOUT MUCH LUCK WHERE AM I GOING WRONG

They need plenty of sun and warmth. Could that be a problem?

Talkback: Growing herbs

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 16:56
nikki2 wrote (see)
I HAVE 3 STANDARD POTS ON MY KITCHEN WALL WHICH IUSE TO TO GROW MY HERB INI.E. MINT BASIL THYME ETC IHAVE BEEN BUYING THEM FROM SUPERMARKETS WITH MIXED RESULTS ANY IDEAS HOW TO MAKE THEM STRONGER AND LAST LONGER NIKKI2

Supermarket herbs, basil in particular, have usually been "forced", grown in hot houses with loads of nutrients. Taken out of that environment they struggle to cope. You're better off buying from plant nurseries.

Basil is very very easy to grow from seed. Just sprinkle the seeds on top of damp mix, pat down firmly, and keep the mix moist till germination. Afterwards they need plenty of sun and reasonable moisture.

Passion Fruit Vine

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 12:58

Ah well, the roots had rooted. Passionfruit are notorious for root problems. Better luck with this one.

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