London (change)
Today 18°C / 6°C
Tomorrow 13°C / 4°C

Jim Macd


Latest posts by Jim Macd

pruning roses

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 19:49

I pruned mine at the weekend. You don't want to prune too early because if there's a frost it will burn new growth so it's not too later at all. 

Peter Beales

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 19:45

So, not only are Peter Beales great for Roses but it seams they're great for Irises too! 

These came today. I couldn't believe how big they were for the price. I was expecting a quarter of the size. There's just four here.

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/38968.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 They came with instructions and labels too! Great service. I gave them a quick soak before I put some compost round them. I probably didn't need to but I'm sure it won't hurt. The compost isn't very wet. Won't get a chance to plant them til the week end. 

Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 18:47

Ooh not had a Rhubarb pie in years and years. Now I want to make one. I always go for crumble because it's easy, but now I want to make a pie. Mmm. 

Carpenteria Californica

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 14:48

It would help if you could show pictures. Investigate under leaves and the stem of the plants from bottom to top, you're looking for anything unusual.

Lawn "Patch"

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 12:34

It sounds like a flower bed filled in and re-seeded to me too. If they use the same seed as the rest of the lawn it will eventually all merge together, it may take time though because the nutrient levels in the bed will inevitably be higher and they could well have sown at a different rate to the rest of the lawn. Any unevenness can be ironed out with top dressing of sharp sand and compost. You'll have to wait and see how it goes really.

The first one I've seen this year - 2014

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 12:04

Hawthorns in hedge - buds opening on Friday, just gone. That's my marker for spring.

Crocks for ....

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 11:56
KEF wrote (see)
Dovefromabove wrote (see)

I only use one or two pieces of curved broken terracotta pot, placed over the drainage hole/s in the pot, like a little bridge, to keep the hole clear of compost so that it drains freely - that's how my granny's gardener showed me how to do it.  That way the pot drains free from surplus water, but loam-based compost doesn't get washed out of the holes. 

That's what I do & for same reason.

 

 Me too, pretty much. I have used wire net to stop soil falling out and those scourers do the same job. I've also use polystyrene blocks to bulk up heavy window boxes so they're lighter. Otherwise I've use pure compost in thousands of sealed containers for even Yuccas if you can control watering. It works perfectly even in pure compost.

Crocks for ....

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 11:51

 

Basically, my understanding was a mixture of large particles will improve water flow, a collection of small, same size particles will impede water flow. So a fine sand won't help drainage, according to what we were told. Any barrier to water flow, such as large stones will impede water flower but in a container, the base is a large barrier.

With containers it's worth remembering that even a leaf can block the hole/holes making your container a boggy pond no matter what you put in on top. I wish that could sum it up but it really doesn't. I just wanted to share the RHS link there.  The blackcurrant bit isn't really important but there are many people that would want to grow a blackcurrant in a pot if they don't have a garden to put on in.

Crocks for ....

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 10:18

I said there was confusion. I remember from my soil science days at college how confusing it was. I'm not sure I took away right knowledge. I was there for the lectures but I may have 'turned my teacher into a demon' on many occasions. (That's an Eastern philosophy quote meaning to get the wrong understanding of what is given. Just in case you were thinking I went to Hogworts. )

Crocks for ....

Posted: 05/03/2014 at 09:07

There's a lot of confusion about why you add crocks to the bottom of a container. Some say to increase drainage etc.. However according to the RHS page on blackcurrants  they say add crocks to the bottom to retain moisture. I'd have quoted but this antiquated [work's] computer won't let me.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Gardening/Grow-Your-Own/Fruit-A-to-Z/Blackcurrants

Discussions started by Jim Macd

Appalling Customer Service!

Replies: 12    Views: 818
Last Post: 18/03/2014 at 18:53

Peter Beales

Great Irises 
Replies: 19    Views: 387
Last Post: 21/03/2014 at 14:48

Crocks for ....

what are crocks for? 
Replies: 9    Views: 204
Last Post: 05/03/2014 at 11:56

Helleborus argutifolius?

Any Hellebore experts? 
Replies: 36    Views: 603
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 10:18

First Wild Daffodil

The First Wild Daffodil in my garden County Durham 
Replies: 7    Views: 234
Last Post: 04/03/2014 at 18:20

Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb

What varieties have you got and which do you like best? 
Replies: 64    Views: 1765
Last Post: 18/03/2014 at 18:27

B&Q dead plants

B&Q dead plants 
Replies: 31    Views: 1472
Last Post: 16/02/2014 at 22:16

Large bird of prey

I just saw a large bird of prey in my Garden 
Replies: 25    Views: 597
Last Post: 06/02/2014 at 11:34

Pulmonaria obscura seeds

Anyone have seeds /plants of Pulmonaria obscura 
Replies: 19    Views: 509
Last Post: 21/12/2013 at 11:30

Crabapples,

Different Crabapple varieties.  
Replies: 29    Views: 758
Last Post: 01/03/2014 at 11:48

Pyrus calleryana chanticleer

Pyrus calleryana chanticleer 
Replies: 8    Views: 375
Last Post: 11/11/2013 at 10:20

Plum tree death

Plum tree has slowly died from the bottom up? 
Replies: 3    Views: 807
Last Post: 02/09/2013 at 21:28

Dog's tooth violet (Erythronium dens-canis)

Replies: 6    Views: 551
Last Post: 12/05/2013 at 09:46

Geranium sanguineum lancastriense

Replies: 2    Views: 394
Last Post: 11/05/2013 at 18:33
14 threads returned