London (change)
Today 14°C / 8°C
Tomorrow 13°C / 11°C

Jim Macd


Latest posts by Jim Macd

What's the star in your garden right now

Posted: 16/06/2014 at 20:11

Gladiole 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49590.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

Hoary Plantain

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49591.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

Columbine

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49593.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

Humble Cats Ear

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49594.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

Welsh poppies

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49596.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

Valerian

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49597.jpg?width=630&height=350&mode=max

 

 

Beetle ID

Posted: 15/06/2014 at 13:34

Beetle ID

Posted: 15/06/2014 at 13:26

I think they're Sloe bugs, Dolycoris baccarat, amazing looking creatures. Sorry I hate spell check sometimes, that should be baccarum

Acer Palmatum seeds

Posted: 15/06/2014 at 13:07

Most seeds don't do well, if they've been allowed to dry out. I know you think most seeds you buy are dry, however, they might look dry but they've been kept in sealed pouches to stop the moisture levels dropping too low. Home collected seed can dry out too much but you usually have more than enough seed to compensate. As nut says, sow fresh, leave them in a shady place in the garden until they come up. Many tree seedlings need one, two or more winters to break their natural dormancy and if the seeds have been badly stored that can induce a secondary dormancy. Lettuce is the best known example of this kind which is why you sow lettuce when it cool. 

Inarching update

Posted: 15/06/2014 at 12:41
Verdun wrote (see)

Always wanted to do grafting myself Jim.  Looks super neat job there. 

Thanks Verdun, you should give it a go then, it really isn't so hard at all..

 

 

LilAmbar wrote (see)

Well done.  I had a go at grafting last year and now have some healthy baby Nana's apple trees.  No idea what they actually are but I had to give it a go for H2B as his Nana's bungalow was being sold and the tree is now no more.

That's a sad story with a happy ending though. It's such a great feeling to know you don't have to lose those precious plants.

 

 

 

home-made-plant-supports

Posted: 14/06/2014 at 17:53

Yeah, I remember the program, I've probably still got it sky+'d but I'm sure you're question's been answered by stuartb3502. I've got some I bought years ago and I otherwise use prunings from shrubs and birch. 

Inarching update

Posted: 14/06/2014 at 17:44

Thanks Dove, you're welcome.

Inarching update

Posted: 14/06/2014 at 17:37

 

I just thought I'd update you on the progress of the inarching. As you can see the tree's growing well, and more than I think it ever did. 

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49378.jpg?width=350

The inarches look healed pretty well

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49380.jpg?width=350

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49381.jpg?width=350

And the good news is the graft wasn't dead after all, though I think you'll agree it doesn't look healthy. 

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49382.jpg?width=350

 

 

Apple tree against a wall

Posted: 14/06/2014 at 17:35

I just thought I'd update you on the progress of the inarching. As you can see the tree's growing well, and more than I think it ever did. 

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49378.jpg?width=284&height=350&mode=max

The inarches look healed pretty well

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49380.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49381.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

And the good news is the graft wasn't dead after all, though I think you'll agree it doesn't look healthy. 

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/49382.jpg?width=280&height=350&mode=max

 

easy plant id

Posted: 09/06/2014 at 11:04

 

I hate using really emotive words like 'thug' for plants. Plants are what they are, some are more vigorous than others, but a vigorous plant may be just what you need for your poor soil, so I really don't think it's helpful to apply such emotive terms, they're just not accurate or helpful. I have that Hellebore self seeded in my garden and I really don't think it a problem, have many things in my garden which are much, much more invasive, but still grow them because they are useful one way or another. As for stinking. I've never noticed.

Discussions started by Jim Macd

Astrantia Roma

Replies: 8    Views: 271
Last Post: 22/06/2014 at 10:57

Inarching update

Update on Apple Spartan graft of two new mm106 rootstocks (inarches) 
Replies: 8    Views: 297
Last Post: 19/10/2014 at 18:12

Incredible luck

It's incredible what you can find when you least expect it.  
Replies: 22    Views: 714
Last Post: 09/06/2014 at 08:50

Geranium sanguineum striatum

Geranium sanguineum striatum other wise known as Geranium sanguineum lancastriense 
Replies: 2    Views: 272
Last Post: 26/05/2014 at 19:32

Appalling Customer Service!

Replies: 12    Views: 1337
Last Post: 18/03/2014 at 18:53

Peter Beales

Great Irises 
Replies: 19    Views: 671
Last Post: 21/03/2014 at 14:48

Crocks for ....

what are crocks for? 
Replies: 9    Views: 450
Last Post: 05/03/2014 at 11:56

Helleborus argutifolius?

Any Hellebore experts? 
Replies: 34    Views: 885
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 10:18

First Wild Daffodil

The First Wild Daffodil in my garden County Durham 
Replies: 7    Views: 409
Last Post: 04/03/2014 at 18:20

Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb

What varieties have you got and which do you like best? 
Replies: 64    Views: 2185
Last Post: 18/03/2014 at 18:27

B&Q dead plants

B&Q dead plants 
Replies: 31    Views: 2732
Last Post: 16/02/2014 at 22:16

Large bird of prey

I just saw a large bird of prey in my Garden 
Replies: 25    Views: 947
Last Post: 06/02/2014 at 11:34

Pulmonaria obscura seeds

Anyone have seeds /plants of Pulmonaria obscura 
Replies: 19    Views: 748
Last Post: 21/12/2013 at 11:30

Crabapples,

Different Crabapple varieties.  
Replies: 31    Views: 1189
Last Post: 18/09/2014 at 21:47

Pyrus calleryana chanticleer

Pyrus calleryana chanticleer 
Replies: 8    Views: 539
Last Post: 11/11/2013 at 10:20
1 to 15 of 18 threads