Joe_the_Gardener


Latest posts by Joe_the_Gardener

Talkback: Planting to cut winter fuel bills

Posted: 08/02/2013 at 15:30

Grandma, I think you should get the company to have a look at the problem. It will only get worse, so get them back to see if they've bodged it up.

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 08/02/2013 at 15:22

I remember a few years ago participating in a massive thread on the BBC website about lunar and other planting. Despite numerous invitations, none of the supporters of this method could come up with any supporting evidence. As several posters have said above, you need to sow when you get a chance and when the weather and soil are suitable.

Unless an independent person or institution gets around to doing genuine, monitored, comparative trials - and someone might be able to point me towards some - I can only conclude that it's a lot of woffle.

I suspect that people who claim to get good results owe any success to the fact that, being slightly fanatical about it, they take particular care to get all the other variables right and so give the seeds/plants the best chance.

Tree ideas.

Posted: 08/02/2013 at 14:55

If you go for birch I would suggest making sure they are one of the very narrow varieties. I have some, but have forgotten the name! Katsura makes a very nice subject as well - there's something elegant about it.

Re-design

Posted: 06/02/2013 at 10:02

I'm not sure Luke will go for that option!

Re-design

Posted: 04/02/2013 at 18:06

No apology necessary Carly! (By the way, she's a teacher, so spends half the weekend on school work, and most of her kids are pre-verbal.) Good luck with the campaign, I'm not against it, but the practicalities and the economy may be. Necessity is usually the mother of invention, so we'll see how things go - if we live long enough.

on their way to garden near you!

Posted: 03/02/2013 at 20:18

Muddy Paws,

Perhaps you could suggest that the school starts a walking bus. It's great socially and even one day a week makes a big difference.

Re-design

Posted: 03/02/2013 at 15:54

I think it's a great ambition, Carly, but it would demand a considerable change of direction from the manufacturers, and they would need to take the public with them if they were not to be left with a warehouse full of unwanted mowers, however well-engineered. 

I bought my daughter an electric mower for about £50 from B&Q to do her little squares of lawn front and back, and I doubt if a push one would be cheaper. And I can cut her privet hedge to perfection in about five minutes with the machine.

She is of a generation that prefers an electric gadget, and she prefers zumba to gardening. I was brought up push-mowing with a Qualcast, but I'm not sure there's any way back.

Trees and shrubs for peat?

Posted: 02/02/2013 at 15:11

Is this area literally a bog, i.e. water table permanently at surface? 

Lawn Trouble

Posted: 02/02/2013 at 15:08

I'd agree with Geoff.

How short you cut the grass is a separate issue. A lot of damage is caused by scalping lawns; just raise the mower by one notch at first and see the difference, then try another notch.

Talkback: Garden birds in the snow

Posted: 02/02/2013 at 11:27

What kinds of hedges do your House Sparrows prefer? My observations suggest that beech is particularly popular, followed by other semi-dense deciduous, then hawthorn, with any sort of evergreen a long way down the popularity list.

Discussions started by Joe_the_Gardener

Jay

Replies: 20    Views: 395
Last Post: 19/09/2014 at 21:05

Useful tool

Replies: 5    Views: 357
Last Post: 27/04/2014 at 12:00

Spring!

Replies: 12    Views: 446
Last Post: 24/03/2014 at 14:55

Gardeners World Quiz

Replies: 0    Views: 208
Last Post: 23/02/2014 at 18:21

Silver birch

Replies: 2    Views: 314
Last Post: 15/02/2014 at 10:53

Hedging shears

Replies: 1    Views: 533
Last Post: 04/12/2012 at 15:43

Malvern

Replies: 1    Views: 634
Last Post: 14/05/2012 at 20:05
7 threads returned