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Joe_the_Gardener


Latest posts by Joe_the_Gardener

Beetroot and Water Voles--Keeping them away!

Posted: 11/01/2013 at 09:29

Water voles are very much associated with water and don't move far from their homes. Are you near waterways?

sanity in need of restoring

Posted: 11/01/2013 at 09:25

I wonder if people's expectations of how quickly a garden can be sorted out are still subconsciously affected by Titchmarsh and his Groundforce chums apparently doing the whole job in a weekend, and by some of the copycat programmes that pop up from time to time. What viewers needed to realise was that a lot of this work was achieved on substantial TV programme budgets and hefty inputs of advertising freebies from suppliers.

The good advice on this thread is to pace yourself and enjoy your achievements while not worrying much about what's still to be done.

As to the two specific comments about work not being properly done by contractors, there is no better way to choose a gardener than by word of mouth recommendation. Talk to them about the job and get a quotation for the exact work required, but accept that when they start digging they might find unexpected problems, so they need to know that they can talk it through with you and come to an agreement about varying the price.

on their way to garden near you!

Posted: 10/01/2013 at 10:11

Ravens here are ready to nest. Their display flights over the house are spectacular - gliding around, wingtips almost touching (think of a pair of skaters); sometimes doing tumbles and rolls and almost flying upside down. And a special melodious piping noise quite unlike their usual snorts and croaks.

 

Tackling erosion

Posted: 07/01/2013 at 09:54

Thanks Carole,

I think I get the picture now. It sounds as though the rockface at the back of the house is essentially stable, but at the top of it there is a less steep slope that is a weathered layer of rock and sandy subsoil. This sounds pretty normal, geologically. Many sandstone cliffs have this sort of weathered layer capping them - the result of many thousands of years of rainfall, freezing, thawing, etc. This appears to be where much of the material is being washed down from - so the presence of a few small rocks in the debris that you have cleared away doesn't indicate that the cliff is collapsing.Then, above this weathered layer there is a woodland on a more organic soil, but which still produces finer debris/soil that the heavy rain is washing down.

Have I got this right, and do you own the bank right up into the woodland?

Joe

Designing a patio: Survey

Posted: 06/01/2013 at 17:36

Not many replies here, which I would imagine is because most people wanting to make a patio would buy or borrow one of the many available good books, look on a website such as this or other practical guide websites, ask a friend, a gardener or a garden centre for advice, and then either do it themselves or hire a professional.

I can't imagine how an advertising agency could add anything to this.

Tackling erosion

Posted: 06/01/2013 at 17:14

Carole,

How high is the bank and what's at the top of it? Is this a newish house? Are any neighbours in a similar situation?

Joe

Can anyone help identity this plant?

Posted: 06/01/2013 at 17:09

When were the pictures taken, Dingo?

New fence has ruined my garden, please help!

Posted: 05/01/2013 at 08:53

I don't think Lauren should have anything to do with the new fence - certainly not trying to support it - this could even be interpreted as criminal damage if the builder is really stroppy.

The solution is to get the council to sort this out.

Lauren, do your deeds say who is the owner of the old fence?

rat

Posted: 04/01/2013 at 17:50

Busy-L

Please don't confuse rats with voles, like Kenneth Grahame did!

Rose,

I think you're being a bit pessimistic about rat numbers. See if you can find a 'listen again' on the Radio 4 programme 'More or Less' a couple of weeks ago.

Break,

Rats' purpose is about as valid as mans'

rat

Posted: 04/01/2013 at 09:41

Rats will take food wherever they can get it, so it's really up to you to decide whether you're OK about them in the garden. If you don't, you can phone the rat-catcher. If you're happy about them at the end of the garden, then keep things clean near the house, so that there's nothing for them there.

You can take away their hiding places, for instance by not storing things untidily. Don't put too much bird food out at once, so there is more chance of the birds finishing it all up without dropping it everywhere. Grains and seeds are among rats' favourite food.

Discussions started by Joe_the_Gardener

Jay

Replies: 20    Views: 478
Last Post: 19/09/2014 at 21:05

Useful tool

Replies: 5    Views: 389
Last Post: 27/04/2014 at 12:00

Spring!

Replies: 12    Views: 478
Last Post: 24/03/2014 at 14:55

Gardeners World Quiz

Replies: 0    Views: 234
Last Post: 23/02/2014 at 18:21

Silver birch

Replies: 2    Views: 340
Last Post: 15/02/2014 at 10:53

Hedging shears

Replies: 1    Views: 559
Last Post: 04/12/2012 at 15:43

Malvern

Replies: 1    Views: 663
Last Post: 14/05/2012 at 20:05
7 threads returned