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Joe_the_Gardener


Latest posts by Joe_the_Gardener

Holey snail

Posted: 21/07/2014 at 14:26

For a biggish bird, thrushes are quite secretive and easily missed (except when singing in spring). Your local wildlife trust or ornithological society would be able to give you an idea of how common they are around your area.

Holey snail

Posted: 21/07/2014 at 14:19

To me, the holes look ragged and, interestingly, seem to be on grooves in the shell which could be lines of weakness. Thrushes seem to start off by gripping the rim of the shell (they don't stab the shell and then hold it or try to eat the snail through the hole) and bashing it on a stone. Presumably this dislodges the snail within the shell. They then grip the snail itself and wrestle with it and bang it on the stone until the snail comes out of the shell. Smaller, thinner shells, like one small yellow one we get around here, don't survive the bashing and end up in pieces, producing quite a lot of debris around the anvil, but the larger ones may well survive intact apart from some slight damage.

Road building anyone?

Posted: 21/07/2014 at 08:03

Unless you do a proper construction job you're wasting your time as this is not a job you want to do twice. Depending on the subsoil you may have to remove anything down to 600mm depth, compact the subsoil surface, fill with two compacted layers of crushed rock sub-base (local quarry or builders' merchant).

Make sure the track is plenty wide enough for the widest vehicle, and then a bit more, and the finished level is 150mm above the adjacent ground, otherwise you will find vehicles running along the edge of the track and dragging soil onto it, making a mess of your job.

Holey snail

Posted: 21/07/2014 at 07:46

I think this may simply be the work of a Song Thrush. They don't necessarily end up beating the snail shell to pieces, although this does happen with smaller, more fragile snails. Often the snail is extracted quite quickly, leaving the shell more or less in one piece with just a few holes from being hit on the stone.

Scarifying

Posted: 21/07/2014 at 07:24

Tell you what, Edd. Forget it.

best mower for sloping lawn

Posted: 18/07/2014 at 20:42

How big is the lawn? What sort of Atco is it and what do you mean by it not coping? The fact that you considered a sit-on mower suggests it can't be very steep; what is he gradient?

TPO and mature Sycamore - to buy or not to buy

Posted: 18/07/2014 at 20:37

Sounds like the tree was there before the houses.

Blackbirds in the mower shed

Posted: 16/07/2014 at 06:21

I'm surprised you don't see the thrush singing, ps2. They usually stand on a very prominent perch.

Rampant Climbing Rose

Posted: 16/07/2014 at 06:17

It's really funny watching it with the sound turned off.

Worried this is Japanese Knotweed!

Posted: 05/07/2014 at 20:57

Hellebore.

Discussions started by Joe_the_Gardener

Useful tool

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Spring!

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Gardeners World Quiz

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Silver birch

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Malvern

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6 threads returned