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John Harding


Latest posts by John Harding

Talkback: Horseflies

Posted: 09/08/2013 at 08:31

Wasps do have a aprt to play in our ecology: amongst other things they prey on Crane Flies (Daddy Longlegs) which emerge from the grub we know as 'leatherjackets' that live in our gardens (particularly lawns) and eat the roots of plants.

When our kids were little we used to like to sit in the garden to have tea on late summer sunny days but the wasps were a real nuisance at that time of year so we took to putting the table close to a Fennel that was in flower which solved the problem. The wasps would far rather have the nectar from fennel that our jam butties.

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 08/08/2013 at 17:08

Gazanias just started flowering, New herb bed is settling down, Chicago Peace Rose produced another flower and Country Taste Tomatoes now starting to ripen

New Herb Bed

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/29043.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

Gazania

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/29045.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

Chicago Peace Rose

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/29046.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

Country Taste Toms: larger one is over 4 inches across

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/29047.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

 

basic-secateur-information

Posted: 08/08/2013 at 15:22

My personal preference is Felco No 2 which I've had for many years but I do have large hands & they are too big for my wife - she has a pair of Wilkinson Sword, smaller & lighter but very good quality. Felco (not to be confused with the cheap name copy 'Fedco') do a number of styles: The No 2 are robust and currently retail at around £60 so not cheap. Spare parts are also available for Felco (just bought a new blade for mine after 25 years at RHS Wisley plant centre last week) - the only part that's needed replacing since I bought them new!

Buy the best you can afford as there is no substitute for quality.

electric-mower-

Posted: 07/08/2013 at 16:53

I personally use an electric Qualcast 13" cylinder mower but you do have to be careful with the elactric lead. It does fine for us but our next door neighbour (who suffers from dementia) has a petrol Honda self propelled (walk behind type) with electric start and that is brilliant. Both I and his neighbour the other side of him offer to cut the lawn for him and I have to say it is a pleasure to use. His lawn is mostly clover, daisies and a few other weeds but it always looks good after it is mown. I wouldn't use it on my lawn for fear of the weed seeds transferring but I would definitely recommend the model to anyone considering a petrol mower. He also has a Mountfield mower of similar size but it is rip-cord start, doesn't always start easily and no-where near as reliable as the Honda - so my recommendation is go for the Honda with an electric start.

GardenIng jokes

Posted: 06/08/2013 at 23:23

Cockerell to hen watching boy eat scrambled egg "There goes our crazy mixed up kid!"

GardenIng jokes

Posted: 06/08/2013 at 16:01

Young man in a fast sports car came around a country bend at high speed only to be faced with a tractor & trailer that had just pulled out of a field into his path. With no time to stop or even slow down without hitting the tractor, the young man crashed through the hedge around the back of the trailer, back through the hedge and onto the road again and disappeared.

"Blige Bert", said the farmer to his lad beside him, "we only just got out of that field in time!"

GardenIng jokes

Posted: 05/08/2013 at 23:36

Executive driving his Porsch 911 down a country lane comes up behind a tractor, pulls out to overtake when the tractor turns right into a gateway without any warning. Clouds of tyre smoke begin to disperse as the exec gets out of his car and rants at the farmer "What the 'ell do you think you're doing, haven't you ever learned to indicate?"

"But I always turns in yer" came the reply!

Blossom End Rot (Toms)

Posted: 04/08/2013 at 23:33

The more your plants grow the greater uptake of water will occur due to the natural transpiration of the plant: more foliage = faster rate of transpiration. If you let the plant dry out and the foliage flops you can restore the foliage if you water in time but the plant's ability to take up some of the nutrients will be impared.

Many gardeners (me included) will reduce some of the foliage to reduce transpiration rates and help send the plant's energy into the production of fruit but for my part I don't like to take too much foliage off because the plant still needs to be able to breathe and photosynthesize.

greenhouse savvy

Posted: 04/08/2013 at 19:59

Forum seems to be 'all at sea' this evening. Made a couple of posts and when checking to see and check for any typos the entry was blank! Seems to have happened here as well so am not really expecting this to appear either!

The spell checker as you type a post isn't working either, just puts up an error code!  

JH

Good Evening FORKERS

Posted: 04/08/2013 at 19:47

Not enough to send to Peterborough nut! it will have gone off by the time the post arrives! Could have dropped some round if I had been at my late gran's as she lived in Garten End Road but sadly Bristol is a long way from there!

Discussions started by John Harding

Signing in problems

log-on keeps dropping out 
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Last Post: 03/06/2014 at 20:12

Signing in problems

log-on keeps dropping out 
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Last Post: 03/06/2014 at 19:57

What's eating my winter Spinach?

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Last Post: 19/11/2013 at 09:12

Email notifications

 
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Last Post: 25/07/2013 at 06:34

Is it me?

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Last Post: 28/06/2013 at 22:42
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