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John Harding


Latest posts by John Harding

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 22:50
Birdy13 wrote (see)
Fairygirl wrote (see)

...There's lots of good people here who are always willing to offer advice and when the weather's duff.......cake..virtual only I'm afraid!! 

Yes, it's a great forum, Very friendly too, and I  do like cake, and therefore the idea of cake (which I suppose is virtual cake). Luckily, I've found I can bake:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25076.jpg?width=613&height=350&mode=max


 

I justify its inclusion in the forum because I like eating cake in the garden. It helps me appreciate all the good things around me. 


Ahh Birdy13, That looks like a Dundee cake, no good for a weegie like fairygirl. Should have put a pic of a deep fried Mars Bar!  John H

Pics of wild flower verges along roads

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 22:47

Interesting you should make that comment Nutcutlet; we were aiming to travel north from Denver to Yellowstone, when we stopped for a coffee we got talking to a local who said "Why, you gotta see the Million Dollar Highway before you leave Colorado" so instead of going north we went west towards Grand Junction, cut off left at Glenwood Springs through the Crystal River gorge to Delta, Monteray and Ouray. The drive from Ouray to Silverton was absolutely fabulous over Red Mountain pass. If you've got a USA map the Million Dollar Highway goes from Ouray to Durango. We never regretted changing our route as we had planned on just hiring a car in Denver and stopping in motels each night which worked out just fine.

Premature potato furtling...

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 22:34

If you like big spuds try growing Kondor. When we had a bigger veg garden I used to grow these and they were ginormous. Sometimes we would get potatoes weighing more than a pound each. Made wonderful chips but my favourite was to bake in the oven, then scoop out all the flesh, mix with cheese & a little butter and then put it back into th skin-cases and microwave for about 1 minute. "Cheesey Crispy Jackets" - Brill!  Sadly can't do that anymore (put on too much weight!)

Pics of wild flower verges along roads

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 22:25

Here are a few more:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25071.jpg?width=647&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25072.jpg?width=524&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25073.jpg?width=538&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25074.jpg?width=530&height=350&mode=max

 This last one is of a 'Clarke's Nutcracker'

Bay tree dying - Newt?

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 21:48

A newt in the container would suggest it's too wet (newts like water) Bays don't like to be wet! They also suffer from the cold weather, particularly don't like frost. Artjak is right, conditions during past winter have been bad for bays and Ericacious is definitely wrong compost.

Pics of wild flower verges along roads

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 21:27

OK, I've managed to get some of my USA slides digitised so here are a few taken on roadside verges in Colorado State in 1991. Sadly the resolution is nowhere near as good as the originals: I'm afraid I dont know what all of them are.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25060.jpg?width=258&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25061.jpg?width=538&height=350&mode=max

Next one is Evening Primrose

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25062.jpg?width=538&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25063.jpg?width=515&height=350&mode=max

 I'll put somemore on a bit later.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 21:18

Hi Salino, Really beautifull pics of clematis on those sites - well done. Still not sure about the Dr Ruppell; close (closer I think than Carnaby) - I'll take an A4 photo with me to Gardeners World Live on Weds and see if I can get it identified for sure.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 14:43
happymarion wrote (see)

John, why not ask the nursery you bought it from - they are hardly likely to have stocked two such similar plants and will have a record of the name.

Sadly I visit so many different Garden Centres & Nurserys I can't remember which one it was now (it was about 5 years ago when we got it). The plant hasn't done much until this year when amazingly it has just suddenly taken off. It was next to an Azalea which was planted in Ericacious compost and we moved the Azalea to another part of the garden with all its soil. That's probably why it's now taken off (our soil is mostly ph7). The Azalea also obviously has liked the move as it's done better this year than ever before.

Summer has arrived

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 12:04
Fairygirl wrote (see)

Carnaby has different stamens John- kind of open whereas Dr R's are  closed. It's also much lighter - more pink and pale pink.

But looking at the pics on Google the stamens on Dr R are red (oops, edit: that was Lincoln Star with red stamens) whereas on mine they're creamy white. Also the Dr R I saw only has 6 sepals - again, mine has 8

The daftest thing you've done in your garden

Posted: 08/06/2013 at 12:00
theohhellwitch wrote (see)

How weird(John Harding) My aunt came to stay with us for a few weeks and she did exactly the same thing with lettuce seeds instead of grass seed also in the 50`s..We also lived in Wycombe at the time(Terriers)...

Must be something to do with Wycombe then! We lived in Clarendon Road, close to the bottom of Hatters Lane below Terriers. John H

 

 

Discussions started by John Harding

What's eating my winter Spinach?

Replies: 9    Views: 262
Last Post: 19/11/2013 at 09:12

Email notifications

 
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Last Post: 25/07/2013 at 06:34

Is it me?

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Last Post: 28/06/2013 at 22:42
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