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Marinelilium


Latest posts by Marinelilium

What Bee friendly climber for West Facing wall???

Posted: 07/06/2014 at 11:53

I adore meadows but...

Luke, some unsolicited advice, front garden meadows in a city may look a bit 'unloved'  in winter and early spring making your property look empty or unattended.

if you can plant lavender in that position the insects will just smother it, the perfume is released as you come and go, low maintenance and evergreen throughout year. Lavender has umpteen uses within the home too. A natural antiseptic and antifungal it also makes lovely bath sachets and sleep pillows.

Never thought I would discourage a wildflower meadow planting though!?!

Cornus Kousa

Posted: 07/06/2014 at 11:27

Last year, mmm...ok. This year it is covered in white bracts.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48436.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

I  agree with Salino that plants, shrubs and trees do appear have strong growth years followed by strong fruiting years.   

Little lemon tree

Posted: 05/06/2014 at 23:34

Well that's a good sign!

If those tiny blisters enlarge you will need a copper sulphate treatment as it could be citrus canker. The yellow circle then gets a brown centre So  do keep an eye on those leaf blisters Lavande. Fingers crossed for you it isn't canker brewing.

Weekly Citrus feed, rose feed or Vitax seaweed will nourish and strengthen but don't over water. Good Luck

What are the best white flowers for bees and butterflies??

Posted: 05/06/2014 at 09:33

Shasta are a butterfly, moth and bee friendly white. The leucanthemum x Superbum ( yer really) is a good open flower which is what the butterflies prefer as their wings can flutter on take off.

Long flowering period too.

Little lemon tree

Posted: 05/06/2014 at 09:06

Welcome back Lavande! wash each leaf with milk and water solution 1 part milk to three parts water ASAP. best to use cotton wool or soft paint brush. Then re-pot using gritty or silver sand ( children's play sand not the awful orange stuff) in the mix.

These are Mediterranean plants so think holiday resort soil. Terracotta pots with either pot feet or gravel under the pot are ideal. Should be a happy little lemon after a Cleopatra bath, new bed and a sunny spot to spend the summer in.

Wait amminute......that will do for me too"

Help! Peaty and boggy soil ... any plant suggestions?

Posted: 31/05/2014 at 20:27
Hostafan1 wrote (see)

hostas , hostas and more hostas. BTW , love that photo of Zantedeschia Marinelilium.

Thanxx. I moo he'd the photo from internet though.  I loved the dark purple ones at Chelsea flower Show too.

Help! Peaty and boggy soil ... any plant suggestions?

Posted: 30/05/2014 at 23:27

Have you considered Zantedeschia? They are so elegant and thrive in wet boggy areas.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/47547.jpg?width=600&height=350&mode=max

 

cuttings

Posted: 30/05/2014 at 19:00

Simon, if you have any willow trees (Salix anything) nearby you can make your own rooting hormone for cuttings.

Cut green twigs, not brown wood, strip off the leaves. Now cut the twig into 5cms pieces and in a container just cover them with boiled water. Like tea.

Leave to cool then add twice as much cold water then strain the twigs out. It will store for a couple of months in an airtight container.

By standing any cuttings in this  the cuttings take up some of the brew which has growth hormone. (A coppiced willow wand will grow upto a metre a summer and cut willow happily roots in soil because of the high hormone levels in Salix). HTH

worst gardening old wives tales

Posted: 30/05/2014 at 18:23

Composting is the nitrogen cycle.  The balance is the key. Carbon (browns) and Nitrogen (greens) need to be about 25:1 in a metre and a half heap. This is from 

http://deepgreenpermaculture.com/diy-instructions/hot-compost-composting-in-18-days/

Browns = High Carbon C:N
Wood chips 400:1
Cardboard, shredded 350:1
Sawdust 325:1
Newspaper, shredded 175:1
Pine needles 80:1
Corn stalks 75:1
Straw 75:1
Leaves 60:1
Fruit waste 35:1
Peanut shells 35:1
Ashes, wood 25:1

Greens = High Nitrogen C:N

Weeds 30:1
Green Wood 25:1
Hay 25:1
Vegetable scraps 25:1
Clover 23:1
Coffee grounds 20:1
Food waste 20:1
Grass clippings 20:1
Seaweed 19:1
Horse Manure 18:1
Cow Manure 16:1
Alfalfa 12:1
Chicken Manure 12:1
Pigeon Manure 10:1
Fish 7:1
Urine 1:1

Feeding plants in the rain?

Posted: 28/05/2014 at 21:44

Vitax seaweed spray is around five pounds for half a litre bottle.  Even. Tesco sell it.

One glass of brown ale per shrub straight into the soil Is enough for a whole season As a quick fix.

Milk in a water solution of upto a third milk to water either straight into soil or as a foliar spray.

(sorry iI should have detailed this in the post) HTH.

 

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