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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Monty Don's French Gardens

Posted: 09/02/2013 at 13:12

Yes, to the point of naivety.  Lyon G - i'm all for a sense of place but thought he could have done more to communicate how to achieve that chez nous.

small veg patch

Posted: 09/02/2013 at 12:15

Yes, divide it into 3 or 4 equal parts so you can rotate crops and avoid building up pests and diseases in the soil and then grow what you love to eat and what is expensive in the shops.  A basic book such as the Vegetable Expert will help with soil preparation, varieties and How To info to get you off to a good start.

Monty Don's French Gardens

Posted: 09/02/2013 at 11:31

I don't know how he does it but he managed to make even potagers seem "weary, stale and unprofitable".   Far too much time wasted in that flipping 2CV and tasting food in markets which could have been better spent actually talking to the gardeners about how they grow their fuit and veg and make it tasty and attractive too.    He also missed a trick not asking the oinion man how he manages to grow healthy onions year after year on the same ground without being infested with disease and pests.  I'd have liked more depth on the Potager du Roi and a lot less faffing. 

Gardenia 'Hardenia' - white - dropping blackend and health leaves.

Posted: 09/02/2013 at 11:19

Frostbite?  A plant which lives indoors should not be put outside in cold weather.  Even one that goes out fo rthe summer needs to be introduced gradually to the outdoors and brought in at night to protect it from changes of temperature.

Keep it sheltered and out of direct sun and water with distilled or rain water and some liquid rose or tomato food to give it a boost.

Introduction

Posted: 09/02/2013 at 11:12

Well done Dove.  I thought it was a dodgy posting and either something like that or our favourite troll.

What are you still eating?

Posted: 08/02/2013 at 18:04

Nothing.  Cavolo nero, purple sprouting, Swiss chard, pak choi and mizuna all frozen to an unsightly mush.

However, the rhubarb is pushing through so we'll be eating that soon enough and I still have some blackcurrants and chillies in the freezer. 

 

Monty Don's French Gardens

Posted: 08/02/2013 at 17:47

Joe Swift isn't really a vegetable gardener and his allotment lasted only as long as the filming.  There's quite a lot of info and comment here, including from people with allotments on that site - http://www.allotments4all.co.uk/smf/index.php/topic,58912.0.html

I'm looking forward to tonight's programmes on potagers or, as the schedule says, the gourmet garden.    Right up my street along with gardens full of colour and perfume and wildlife.  Can't see there being a lot of buzzing in all those hedges in the very formal hedge and topiary gardens he so likes.. 

 

 

types of pots

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 19:04

I smell a Grid.

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 18:13

There are studies:-

Examined was the relationship between lunar position and the day of delivery and the synodic (in astronomy, length of time during which a body in the solar system makes one orbit of the sun relative to the earth) distribution of spontaneous deliveries, especially in relation to the presence of a full moon. A retrospective analysis of 1248 spontaneous full-term deliveries in three-year period (36 lunar months) was done at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Civil Hospital, Fano (Marche, Italy). The results showed a connection between spontaneous full-term deliveries and the lunar month. The effect of the phases of the moon seems to be particularly relevant in mothers who had birthed before.

And another in France:-

There are published works that show that there is such a relationship. One study4 looked at 5,927,978 French births occurring between the months of January 1968 and the 31st December 1974. Using spectral analysis, it was shown that there are two different rhythms in birth frequencies: –a weekly rhythm characterized by the lowest number of births on a Sunday and the largest number on a Tuesday and an annual rhythm with the maximum number of births in May and the minimum in September-October. A statistical analysis of the distribution of births in the lunar month shows that more are born between the last quarter and the new moon, and fewer are born in the first quarter of the moon. The differences between the distribution observed during the lunar month and the theoretical distribution are statistically significant.” – Source: Full moon, Gravitational Pull and Childbirth, Birthsource.com

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 17:19

Actually, lunar cycles do affect quite a few people's behaviour, hence the word "lunatic" to describe people with what used to be preceived as madness.  Ask any midwife about when women's  waters are most likely to break and the answer will be during a full moon.

Let the doubters doubt.  Let those who believe believe and let those who just need a bit of help organising their time follow the calendar as they wish but let's be clear.  This is not gardening by moonlight.  This is gardening according to the cycle of the moon as it orbits the earth each month.

Discussions started by obelixx

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9 threads returned