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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

types of pots

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 19:04

I smell a Grid.

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 18:13

There are studies:-

Examined was the relationship between lunar position and the day of delivery and the synodic (in astronomy, length of time during which a body in the solar system makes one orbit of the sun relative to the earth) distribution of spontaneous deliveries, especially in relation to the presence of a full moon. A retrospective analysis of 1248 spontaneous full-term deliveries in three-year period (36 lunar months) was done at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Civil Hospital, Fano (Marche, Italy). The results showed a connection between spontaneous full-term deliveries and the lunar month. The effect of the phases of the moon seems to be particularly relevant in mothers who had birthed before.

And another in France:-

There are published works that show that there is such a relationship. One study4 looked at 5,927,978 French births occurring between the months of January 1968 and the 31st December 1974. Using spectral analysis, it was shown that there are two different rhythms in birth frequencies: –a weekly rhythm characterized by the lowest number of births on a Sunday and the largest number on a Tuesday and an annual rhythm with the maximum number of births in May and the minimum in September-October. A statistical analysis of the distribution of births in the lunar month shows that more are born between the last quarter and the new moon, and fewer are born in the first quarter of the moon. The differences between the distribution observed during the lunar month and the theoretical distribution are statistically significant.” – Source: Full moon, Gravitational Pull and Childbirth, Birthsource.com

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 17:19

Actually, lunar cycles do affect quite a few people's behaviour, hence the word "lunatic" to describe people with what used to be preceived as madness.  Ask any midwife about when women's  waters are most likely to break and the answer will be during a full moon.

Let the doubters doubt.  Let those who believe believe and let those who just need a bit of help organising their time follow the calendar as they wish but let's be clear.  This is not gardening by moonlight.  This is gardening according to the cycle of the moon as it orbits the earth each month.

Beetle

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 14:30

Look up fur beetles which are native and Asian long horned beetles which are a pest and look quite spidery. 

Growing Lillies in containers

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 12:45

Best to do it as soon as poss or they'll dry out and fail.

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 12:04

Thanks Sam.  Just need some patience.  Have fun with the link.   I tend to use the biodynamic version as it splits activities into leaves, flowers, fuits and roots which I find easy to stick to.

Chris Beardshaw to join Beechgrove Garden

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 11:59

I find Jim easy to understand and he has alovely way with him.   Chris Beardshaw began his career as a lecturer at Pershore College and later moved in to TV presenting and design.  He's a real plantsman who's very good at right plant right place and also planting combinations.   

I've watched Beechgrove for a couple of years now and find it very informative and entertaining though I'm less keen on the community project programes.   It gives excellent advice, runs proper trials of plants and products and the team all works well togther and with humour.  CB will make a very good addition to the team.

 

 

Growing Lillies in containers

Posted: 07/02/2013 at 11:52

I grow all my lillies in pots outside so I can move them into a prominent position when in bloom and tuck them away when they're just foliage.   I have 9 bulbs in one 60cm pot and just 5 in another so I fill thegaps with annuals like lobelia.   I used to have many more but got rid after a bad infestation of lily beetle but I have succumbed again.

I put a layer of wine corks and grit in the bottom for drainage and then use good quality general purpose compost.   I give occasional liquid feeds of rose or tomato food to help the bulbs produc ebetter flowers each year and also add a handful of pelleted chicken manure to the soil each spring for a general feed.

You need to keep a regular eye out for red lily beetle as they and their young will devastate lillies in no time.  Squish the adults and remove the slimy globs of larvae with a blast from the hose or a damp cloth.

  

Talkback: Gardening by the moon

Posted: 06/02/2013 at 23:16

I used moon cycles for sowing all my seeds a few years ago and had excellent germination results.   I then tried using the moon cycles to determine what I did in the garden on a given day and again had good results.   I didn't keep records but I did generally find my time was more productive if only because having set out to weed or prick out, or lift and divide, prune and so on, that was what I did without being distracted by other jobs.

Last year I had to have surgery for a slipped disc and that severely limited my time in the garden.  This year it's surgery for new feet so my garden is now a weedy, overgrown mess.  When I do get back out there I'll be following the lunar cycle so I concentrate my energies on doing one job well at a time and I won't be staring at the rest and feeling overwhelmed.

There's an easy calendar guide here - http://www.the-gardeners-calendar.co.uk/Moon_Planting.asp

 

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Clematis flowering problems

Posted: 06/02/2013 at 22:34

Joesephine is a group 2 which means she should have a light prune immediately after the first flush of flowers in May and June to remove dead heads and any unwanted or old stems.  It should then be given a good dollop of slow release clematis food or blood fish and bone and a liquid boost of rose or tomato food.   This is particularly important for plants in pots with limited resources.   Given this encouragement, she should produce a secon flush of flowers at the end of summer but they will probably be less double.

Josephine is also known to be an unreliable flowerer if grown in poor conditions and may even produce greenish flowers if there isn't enough sunlight available.

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9 threads returned