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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Safe species for a tall hedge in high density housing estate?

Posted: 02/02/2013 at 12:51

My hawthorn hedge grows 6' a year so beware.   It will want to take up a lot of width too if you can't keep it regularly trimmed and that means losing the berries for teh birds. 

Given you want to maximise space I think a fence and trellis with climbers are going to be your best baet and will avoid problems with roots and neighbours.   You can add one or two evergreen pyracantha to the mix of plants.  They have blossom which provides nectar in spring and then berries for birds in autumn.   Mix it up with roses and clematis and winter flowering jasmine and you'll have something of interest all year without taking up too much space. 

 

 

Square Food Gardening!

Posted: 30/01/2013 at 12:52

The idea is that you grow small groups of veggies in small squares and on a rotational basis.  Depending on the size of the mature plant you can get more, or fewer, per square foot.   It doesn't seem at all low maintenance to me as you have to keep up with constant weeding and top dressing with compost to maintain maximum growth and soil fertility.  

It might work as a low maintenance herb garden as, if it's sheltered in winter and well drained for the woody Meditarranean herbs, they'd stay in place for years.  Of course things like parsley and basil and chives will need more moisture so aren't that compatible. 

Does the grass stay green?

Posted: 25/01/2013 at 11:00

In my experience, the grass in Switzerland goes brown in winter and looks dreadful as the snow starts to melt, especially in th ehigher skiing zones and the valleys and roads leading to them.  Maybe lower down in the valleys it stays green underneath but not high up.   Here in central Belgium our own grass stays green if the snow doesn't last too long but two years ago when deep snow stayed on the garden and fields for over 6 weeks it was decidedly yellowish but soon recovered.

Seeds from abroad

Posted: 24/01/2013 at 17:56

Bringing in seeds from the EU is OK.  From anywhere else they have to be government certified from a recognised and licensed supplier.  This is to reduce the risk of disease and other nasty pathogens and insect eggs entering the UK and Europe.

Why take the risk, not to mention all those air miles and dodgy quality control?

They're cheap enough to buy here and safe too and more likely to germinate because of quality controls.

 

 

Pruning

Posted: 24/01/2013 at 13:06

You need to consult a qualified tree surgeon who can look at the tree and see if it can be thinned out by removing some branches and/or have its canopy raised to allow more light underneath.  Generally speaking, just taking out height at the top is a bad idea as the tree will look ugly and it will just thicken its canopy in response and look worse.

squirrel shot for coming to the table.

Posted: 18/01/2013 at 16:56

Actually, grey squirrels are the intruders in Britain and are pushing the native reds further and further north and reducing their numbers year by year.

Grey squirrels are officially classed as vermin and it is legal to kill them humanely.  It is illegal to release a captured grey squirrel back into the wild.

Infuriating for people who want to feed the native birds to see these tree rats nicking the food.

 

what do you think is the best make of bird food you have bought?

Posted: 17/01/2013 at 22:09

Being country birds ours love corn of all descriptions.  Our garden backs on to arable fields and it's a mad house at harvest time when there's wheat, barley or oats being spilled as they harvest and then along the sides of the road where it falls from the trailers being driven to the weighing station.

Allotment Wars- BBC1 Tuesday 22nd January

Posted: 17/01/2013 at 14:34

The BIg Dig went out mid afternoon and everyone complained that anyone interested in allotments was either at their allotment or collecting their kids from school so an evening slot seems eminently reasonable to me.

Has anyone got any snow yet?

Posted: 16/01/2013 at 09:59

-13C at 8am thi smorning and another fall of snow overnight.which makes 3" sitting on my sleeper walls and garden table.

More heavy snow expected at the weekend.  Dreadful timing as it's the dance club's annual ball and I expect a lot of punters to duck out.  More space for dancing though not for me as I have a major foot op coming up on the 28th.

what do you think is the best make of bird food you have bought?

Posted: 15/01/2013 at 18:16

I've tried niger seed - no takers - and all sorts of other fancy stuff but what our visitors and residents like best are the ordinary fat balls, peanuts and loose seed for the ground feeders.  I usually find the price of loose peanuts and seed is better than the pre-packaged stuff.  I can buy a mix of broken seeds and grains for just €1,50 a kilo but pay double for mixes with whole sunflower seeds in.  I tend to offer a mix of the two.

They also like the flesh and seeds I scrape from pumpkins, ditto melons in summer (no 1 cat likes those too) plus home made fat and seed loaves and just recently some leftover pumpkin and sultana muffins.

Discussions started by obelixx

Hello Jro - and any other old friends

Catch up chat 
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Mare's tail

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Encouraging bats in our gardens

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Weekend 22 March

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Good Morning - 21 March

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Choosing chillies

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Hanging baskets and window boxes

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New shed - any tips?

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Last Post: 12/01/2013 at 08:55
9 threads returned