obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Weekend 22 March

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 12:52

I had mine outside the back door of the garage right next to an electric socket for heater and propagator and a tap for watering.    All very convenient except it was the north side of the house and had a 3'6" retaining wall round two sides so lilmited light and heat so last year we moved it to the front south east corner of teh garden where it gets loads of light and is sheltered from prevailing westerlies by an 8' hedge.

Great in summer but so far no direct electricity or water so less easy to manage.   These will come some time this summer I hope and then it'll be easier.

Right now it's too cold for babies so I have seedlings starting to get leggy on window sills.  I just hope next week is abit warmer so they can go out.

The first Gardeners' World

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 12:27

I couldn't bear Tony B's presenting style or his lackof care and repsct for plants and tools.  I also thought Greenacres itself was ill conceived and most of his projects like that pond stack and the fake front gardens were risible.

Barsndale may not have been Geoff H's own back garden but he made all the different sites within it feel as though they were and showed planting styles and designs that were do-able or adaptable by most people however large or small their plot.

AT bought extra land to accommodate new projects for GW and, whilsts most have us have neither funds nor space for a grove of tree ferns, he did other projects which were adaptable and informative.

I really do feel that Monty is not, and never has been, in touch with ordinary gardening mortals and the amount of time, money and psace they have so his gardnen projects do not lend themseves to ordinary gardens even when the advice is sound.

This new series has not yet got me excited about gardening again when the weather improves which is pretty damming given how long it's been sicne I could get out there.

Beechgrove is, like Barnsdale, laid out as a series of smaller themed gardens and it has a veggie plot with normal and raised beds plus polytunnels and greenhouses so they can show all the different planting and care techniques and the advantages of each.   They also have trial beds, give good practical info, ackowledge the gardening team behind the show and there's a fact sheet too.

GW - look to your laurels!

rabbit proof plants

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 10:48

The RHS suggests the following list of plants as being rabbit resistant.  Some arther good ones in there - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=209 

Greenhouse

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 10:04

E-bay?  freecycle?  Local ads?

Best Fuchsia

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 10:04

Why has fuchsia become future in my post?   Mystery.

I have some more tender fuschias a friend gave me and I've overwintered those under a skylight in an attic that doesn't get below -5C and they're looking very sad.  i think we'll have to have a chat about being positive.

Weekend 22 March

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 10:00

J-G - how big a pond?

Lillies in pots should be OK BPK.   I always lose any planted in the ground anyway.

Bunny - I have a big Labrador and a smaller Wheaten style terrier of unknown parentage.  Both very "helpful" in the garden.   He like sto sprawl on the beds and watch and he likes to dig out moles and other rodents.  Both play ticky with gay abandon all over the lawn and beds.

Busy, whereabouts near Poitier?  We holidayed near Ruffec last year and loved it so are going back to explore some more.  If Belgian winters carry on like this we'll probably head that way permanently once OH retires and Possum finishes uni.   Long, cold, wet winters are bad for my soul and my incipient arthritis.

PP - very virtuous but you'll be conscience free when the good weather does come and you escape outside.

Gardening Shows

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 08:54

There's also a monthly show in London organised by the RHS at its own halls.  I went a couple of times when we were still in teh UK and they were very good - excellent plants and also a lecture.   Local shows are good too.

Here in Belgium there are spring and autumn shows I like to go to.  No show gardens but lots of good stalls selling plants and gardening goodies.  I have developed good relationships with a couple of nurseries who will happily let me order plants for collection at the show and save me a trip to the Ardennes to their nurseries and I have a favourite clematis Man who tells me which will cope with teh cold in my garden and labels his plants with hardiness in degrees centrigade to -25C.

If anyone else is gardening in Belgoum, PM me for a list of shows this April, May and June.

Best Fuchsia

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 08:46

Getting back to the question of a hardy future, I have a variegated magellanica which has survived outside for 5 or 6 years despite winters down to -25C.   It's in a well drained spot in fertile soil and gets full sun in spring and then is shaded in summer.

It  can be late getting going again after a very hard winter but it does survive and I dare say if I gave it more TLC would recover faster.

Weekend 22 March

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 08:34

Good morning everyone.

I realise that much of Britain is under snow or exeperiencing heavy rain today and hope you and your gardens come through OK.    Perversely, here it is sunny again but freezing and the ground is  like iron.

No outdoor gardening for me then today but I shall ask OH to help me tidy up my work area tomorrow so it's ready for action when spring does arrive with intent.   On Sunday we're taking Possum and a friend to Antwerp to see a Hip Hop Battle competition so no gardening then either.

So, today is more seedling turning for me.   What about you? 

Good Morning - 21 March

Posted: 22/03/2013 at 08:28

None of my hostas is showing yet Bunny but when they do there are a few I want to lift and move and maybe divide depending on how big they are.    I think you'd be best waiting till yours are active.  The only thing is that the big leaved hostas produce smaller leaves their first year after being split and then they recover normal form from teh following season.

As for chocolate, I live in Belgium so am spoiled for choice.  There are the big names like Côte d'Or for bars and then lots more doing pralines or filled chocolates and our local baker/patissier makes his own too.........   Nowhere to hide really.

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