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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Moles AND Crane flies

Posted: 22/11/2013 at 22:45

Here in Belgium we can buy a device called a Détaupeur which translates as de-moler.   It is a battery powered machine which ignites a small explosive charge laid in the tunnel when moley comes along and makes the connection.    You can't buy them in the UK but they're available in France and Belgium if any of you is planning a holiday and wants to google for suppliers.

We used ours successfully for several years but now we have two dogs and don't want to risk one of them setting one off by mistake so we put up with moles and mole hills and the terrier cross occasioanlly digging for China when she hears a mole on the move.   The worst periods are spring when they're tunnelling to find a mate and then mid to late summer when the babies leave the nest and head off to find their own territories.

However, like Berghill, we've had our share of expensive plants lost and veggie crops ruined because their roots have been tunneled as well as people injured because they've walked on a collapsing tunnel in the lawn and dreadful spinal pain for me when walking on ground made uneven didn't help with my slippe ddiscs and trapped nerves.  Makes mowing the grass a bit bumpy too.

Problem Pelargoniums

Posted: 22/11/2013 at 22:31

Too sudden a heat change?  Maybe you broke up the roots too much when you potted them and they couldn't recover? 

weeping willow

Posted: 22/11/2013 at 17:00

It might be a Kilmarnock willow and they do look pretty awful through summer.  Theyr'e grafted onto a root stock so don't get any higher but do get wider and the branches are often too long for their height.  Deeply unattractive IMHO.

Bug Hotel

Posted: 22/11/2013 at 14:58

Different sizes for different insects.   Use dry hollow stems such as bamboo canes tied in bundles and stuffed in some old pipe or a bird's nest box with the front taken off.  If drilling in a block of wood use a 6, 8 and 10 bit for diffrent size holes.

planting Hawthorh from cuttings

Posted: 21/11/2013 at 13:36

We have a very good stretch of hawthorn hedge planted as a single row of whips 10 years ago.  We prepared the ground well and trimmed them back to 9" after planting in late November.   They grew 6' in their first year.   We pruned them back again to about 3' to thicken them up and now keep the whole hedge about 6' high.   It makes an excellent wind break for that part of the garden and provides food and shelter for birds and insects.

You'd get a similar effect form sowing seeds but it would take just a bit longer and you'd have to weigh up the cost of seed trays and pots and compost against the cost of the whips.

Jet Washers

Posted: 21/11/2013 at 12:31

OH bought one of those attachments for us too.  Very pleased with himself for getting it a good reduced price - except our terrace and front paths are old granite setts so not flat enough.   Doh!

Jet Washers

Posted: 21/11/2013 at 11:28

Karcher here too.

Planting roses

Posted: 20/11/2013 at 21:29

Bury it about 2 inches/5cms below soil level.

Can you get a Bay Plant?

Posted: 20/11/2013 at 12:29

Yes.  Just look around in garden centres although it's probably the wrong end of the season for them.   Some supermarkets have them in their fresh herb section.

The smaller plants can be kept bushy simply by removing leaves as you need them for cooking or you could remove lower leaves and gradually make a pom pom shape and grow more prostrate horizontal herbs such as thyme below.  That's what I've done but I have to bring it in over winter as they freeze to death outside in my winters whether in pots or in the ground.

Baby Memorial Garden

Posted: 19/11/2013 at 17:05

I have a very exposed garden that gets colder than Yourkshire so can recommend a few clematis.  You can check their details - flower, size, pruning group on this site - http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/

Nelly Moser; Rhavarinne, Blue Angel (Blekitny Atholl), Alba Luxurians, Omoshiro, Huldine, Etoile Violette, Little Nell, Princess Diana, Red Ballon, Red Robin, Arabella, Chrystal Fountain.

For perennials, have a look at phlox, echinops, aconitums, phlomis, chelone, hemerocallis, hostas, grasses such as hakonechloa, miscanthus, carex, molinia, asters, physostegia, astilbes, Japanese anemones, peony...

For shrubs, have a look at coloured stemmed cornus such as alba sibirica and Midwinter fire.  They need to be pruned back hard every spring or two to maintain tehir colour so won't get too big.   Consider evergreens such as variegated holly which is slow growing and can be pruned to shape.  

Go and have alook at Harlow Carr for ideas and get a soil test kit so you know whether the soil is acid, neutral or alkaline.  Add plenty of well rotted garden compost or manure too improve fertility and drainage then get planting.  Bit late this year but don't forget bulbs like snowdrops and daffs for early spring colour.

 

Discussions started by obelixx

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9 threads returned