Obelixx


Latest posts by Obelixx

Strictly is back!

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 19:46

There were some crocks last year but there always are.  There were some fabulous routines too where music, choreography, dancing and sometimes even the costumes got pretty close to perfection.   Hoping for more of the latter this year.

Hello Forkers ... September edition

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 19:40

Having a waist that has always been 12" less than my hips, jeans have always been a problem so I sew elastic into the back waist belt and then wear them into the ground.


Glad you didn't have to take off your wheels Hosta.  So much easier.


Dogs have been walked and fed.   So have we.  Now to spend an hour or so correcting Possum's English phrasing and spelling - application letters to various companies and institutions to do a placement as part of her degree course.   Here goes.......

Last edited: 25 September 2017 19:40:28

Compost question

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 17:03

You do need some moisture for the bacteria to function and you also need air so, if you can, turn what's left in there, water it or let it be rained on for a day or two and then cover it to keep in the heat and speed up the process.

Hello Forkers ... September edition

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 17:02

Having spent years working in an office environment that required suits and ties for men and the equivalent "smart" attire for women (but not obligatory heels) I was very happy to embrace t-shirts and jeans with just one or two smarter trousers and tops.   Then we started dancing and skirts snuck in.   That meant an annual raid on M&S for fair trade t-shirts and any cotton skirts they had on sale and an occasional gander round markets.


Always a nightmare trying to find something more dressy or formal for balls and weddings so I started sewing again and enjoy it more than I have for a long while.  Just as well as I have no idea about clothes shops round here.  Occasionally I buy cotton tops and tunics online from those Brave people who do bras and clothes for gifted women - always in the sales and I find them very good but all their frocks are way too short for me now I'm 27 and not that short either.


Been having a lovely grubby time cleaning muck and old finishes off a dining table and chairs, rescuing autumn daffs from the masons digger and pruning the lower stems from 2 mophead hydrangeas.  OH decided to clear the long grass and weeds from along the north side of the ruin where I've been hiding pots from the heat of the midday sun and discovered they were so shallow rooted they just came up leaving lovely bare soil.   I now have a 150cm wide bed along the whole length.........   Cardboard for now and then put the pots back to hold it down till I have time to think about how to plant it up.


Clari - our pair are dozy too but it'll soon be time for walkies and that should get them moving.

Plants we wish they'd stop selling.

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 16:47

GD - how far back are you going for non native?  The Romans brought all sorts with them - lavender, rosemary etc - and just how much good native plant material is there on Guernsey?   Not your clematis, I'll bet.   Rhododendrons?  Azaleas? Hostas? Roses other than dog?   


The trick is not to avoid introductions but to use them well so they encourage wildlife to feed, shelter and breed and don't invade or over power natural habitats and that's down to thoughtful, responsible gardening and gardeners.

advice on winter cloche materials?

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 15:30

If it's porous enough to let air thru than be wind resistant it's going to let in all the cold air that will stunt or kill growth.


Plastic bottles with their bottoms removed work well for individual plants then cold frames or tunnel cloches for groups or rows.   If you can peg the frames down deeply enough they should withstand quite a bit of wind.   Have a look around here for some ideas - http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/gardening/cloches-and-cold-frames


Also, look on Youtube for Geoff Hamilton making cloches and cold frames.  He was a whizz at sturdy stuff made for little expense.

Strictly is back!

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 15:25

Human memory is selective PG and often has rose tinted specs or a "not my fault" slant.  That's why they now give mini video cams to some police officers and advise dash cams for drivers.


Being cynical, I suspect the main aim of SCD is to have a fairly cheap, crowd pleasing programme that boosts viewing figures and wups ITV.  I used to enjoy the professional dance demos more when they brought in world class experts from many disciplines rather than the recent development of group dances done with the home gang, even tho some are or have been world class.  It's not the same.

Strictly is back!

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 14:33

History is about personages too Frank.   I do think the judges identified the best dancers on the night but were more harsh on the earlier dancers and too tolerant with the later ones.  Maybe, since the new judge is keen on correct footwork, the director will allow us shots of the feet in future.  Live in hope and all that.

Plants we wish they'd stop selling.

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 14:29

I'm keeping the roses - as long as they repeat flower or at least produce masses of hips and have perfume and disease resistance.


Agree with all the rest mentioned and would add poinsettias and all other euphorbias, begonias in any shape or form, golden rod.    No doubt more will occur to me.

Last edited: 25 September 2017 14:30:10

Small, overlooked garden, privacy & design ideas

Posted: 25/09/2017 at 11:50

You could ditch the suffering tree which is likely to get too big anyway and build a pergola round the back wall.  Screw some battens to the wall and attach trellis panels - wood or metal as you prefer - and then make a 3' wide border and improve the soil all along that wall by digging in loads of well-rotted manure and/or mushroom compost and then plant climbers which will cover the trellis and extend up over the pergola.  That should give you some privacy without cutting light.


Bamboos en masse are desperately dull and far too dominating IMHO, even if they don't sucker and spread.

Discussions started by Obelixx

Garden visits - Asphodèle group, Vendée

Photos of two very different gardens visited on 17/10 
Replies: 16    Views: 519
Last Post: 24/09/2017 at 20:02

Loire chateaux

Pics of a few chateaux and grounds 
Replies: 12    Views: 403
Last Post: 09/09/2017 at 19:19

Hello Forkers ... September edition

A friendly place of frolics and conversation where everyone is welcome to join in to chat and procrastinate to their heart's content... 
Replies: 1326    Views: 38394
Last Post: 01/10/2017 at 10:13

Who's nicked my figs?

Mystery fig disappearance 
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Last Post: 11/06/2017 at 09:04

Snake ID please

Found canoodling in the sun but what are they? 
Replies: 4    Views: 418
Last Post: 03/06/2017 at 09:22

Clematis ID

Can you name this clematis? 
Replies: 9    Views: 436
Last Post: 20/05/2017 at 14:26

Feeble hyacinths or Spanish bluebells?

Opinions please 
Replies: 6    Views: 346
Last Post: 06/04/2017 at 17:42

Polytunnel

Erection and siting 
Replies: 4    Views: 404
Last Post: 18/02/2017 at 17:32

Cutting garden

Tips please 
Replies: 22    Views: 1762
Last Post: 08/06/2017 at 22:33

Walnuts

What to do with them 
Replies: 11    Views: 640
Last Post: 14/11/2016 at 21:06

Weather station

Recommendations please 
Replies: 2    Views: 461
Last Post: 08/11/2016 at 14:53

Clematis varieties

New varieties (to me). Anyone grow them? 
Replies: 21    Views: 1352
Last Post: 30/10/2016 at 21:45

Non fruiting fig

How to prod it into fruiting mode? 
Replies: 5    Views: 510
Last Post: 18/09/2016 at 12:30

Another ID please

 
Replies: 6    Views: 480
Last Post: 20/07/2016 at 12:46

Shrub ID please

 
Replies: 4    Views: 691
Last Post: 05/06/2016 at 20:00
1 to 15 of 32 threads