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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Pale yellow or lemon plants

Posted: 14/05/2014 at 15:33

Honeysuckle - lonicera etrusca superba

Potentilla fruticosa Vilmoriniana

Iris Early Light

For later on there are some pale yellow and/or creamy dahlias and chrysanthemums.

Pale yellow or lemon plants

Posted: 14/05/2014 at 11:04

The pale yellow scabious is also called giant scabious.  It produces strong rosettes of well shaped leaves about 60cms high and wide and then really tall stems of light, airy creamy yellow flowers o stems up to 6' tall.  Mine is a stronger colour than the one shown here - http://www.seedaholic.com/cephalaria-gigantea.html but still creamy enough for your needs.

Mine enjoyed last summer and made lots of babies.  Happy bonus.

What's wrong with my clematis? And what can I do?

Posted: 13/05/2014 at 17:52

If it's wilt youhave to cut it all down before the wilt travels down the stems into the roots and kills the whle plant.

Bite the bullet, chop it back and feed well with slow release clematis food.   You can also give it an instant tonic with liquid rose or tomato feed.

Cocoa Shell Mulch

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 22:06

It's the chocolate content that's bad for pets, especially dogs who are more likely to eat it than cats.    Use ordinary bark mulch instead.

Dahlia Cuttings

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 22:04

I'd limit myself to taking cuttings from the tubers with multiple shoots and would grow on the ones with only one shoot in the hopes of building up vigour to get more shoots next year.   

GARDENERS' WORLD 27 April 2014 ratings success

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 20:56

Well, in Geoff Hamilton's day the programme had over 3 million viewers.

I suspect the Beeb may think better about taking GW off, especially on long weekends when we all want to be out there in our gardens, if more gardeners wrote and complained about snooker and other sports taking its place.   GW always use dto be a constant and I can't see why we gardeners can't have our 30 minutes even in Wimbledon fortnight or World cups or Olympics.

However, I find Monty Don generally so out of touch with ordinay gardeners now that I just thank heaven for Beechgrove which combines solid gardening advice on many subjects with a sense of fun.

Mad veg idea needed for small terrace house front garden

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 14:58

Small pumpkins such as Utchi Kuri or Sweet Dumpling would do very well and are small enough for the fruiting stems to be trained uwards on obelisks or frames of some sort to allow several plants to be grown.   Maybe a bit late to start them this year but you could buy plants in a good garden centre or make a note to order seeds for next year when the time comes.

For winter, you could grow colourful stemmed Ruby chard and purple sprouting broccoli which you can sow now in pots or modules and pot on until you have space to plant them out in the autumn after you've cleared your summer crops and added some good garden compost or other soil conditioner to maintain fertility.

What's wrong with my clematis? And what can I do?

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 14:47

You need to cut off and remove all the stems at the base and give your plant an instant tonic of liquid rose or tomato feed so that it can recover.    You can also give it a generous handful of slow releas cleatis food and mulch it - after it's had a good drink - with well rotted compost or garden manure or bought in soil conditioner to retain moisture round the roots and encourage beneficial soil organisms which will help it absorb food more easily and make it stronger.

It may take a while to recover so be patient and scatter a few wildlife friendly slug pellets the minute you see new shoots coming through as they are slug and snail caviar.   Feed it, as above, every spring and early summer and it will eventually grow big and strong and not succumb to clematis wilt and be better able to deal with pests - just as well nourished humans with a balanced diet have a better immune system and fight off illness.

 

Peanuts for birds

Posted: 11/05/2014 at 11:26

They'll be fine and probably all gone by the end of May anyway.

Peanuts for birds

Posted: 11/05/2014 at 10:43

If the peanuts are sticking together or looking a bit mouldy, throw them away and clean and rinse the feeders thoroughly.   It's fine to offer them in feeders as they can't get whole ones out that will then choke their babies.   Don't offer them as loose feed.  

I keep all my peanut, fat ball, insect block and loose seed feeders topped up all year so that I have healthy adults prodcing healthy eggs and with the energy to forage for insects and larvae to feed their young who need juicy food for its moisture as much as its protein to grow well.  It works very well and I never have to spray for pests.

However at certain periods of the year they forage in my garden, local fields and woods so consumption of my offerings slows down.  Even the best quality peanuts can get a bit mouldy if left long enough, particularly in wet conditions so it's just a case of regular checking and cleaning as necessary.

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10 threads returned