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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Wooden Raised Beds

Posted: 09/12/2013 at 19:20

Thank you.   It was, but I've had some disastrously cold winters since I took those photos and lost a lot of those plants.   I've also lost a year in the garden thanks to needing remodelling of both feet and having surgery in January and April so the weeds have been having a field day.   However, I'm starting to get back on top of things and am adjusting my plantings to suit the colder winters.

It will be much better again by spring and better still the following year - optimistic folk we gardeners.

 

Madame Alfred Carriere

Posted: 09/12/2013 at 13:50

Have you the space to put up training wires to tie it in horizontally?   Climbing roses and ramblers flower best on spurs coming from horizontally or diagonally trained main stems as this aids the flow of nutrients along the stem.

If not, I suggest you find a good home for Mme AC and consider replacing it with something like a City of York rose which won't grow quite so long and has repeat flowers.  

Wooden Raised Beds

Posted: 09/12/2013 at 13:35

We have raised beds built from a combination of a railway sleeper retaining wall to make the ground level and then roofing beams for the beds.  The railway sleepers have blck polythene stapled to teh inside to prevent any chemicals leaking into the soil but also to prevent water seeping in from the soil and rotting them prematurely.

The sleeper walls have been in place for a good 15 years and are doing fine.  The roofing beams are recent and have been treated with an oil based wood stain to give added portection.  They replaced ordinary untreated planed pine planks which had had 2 coats of Cuprinol.   They lasted between 10 and 13 years with no other protection. 

We placed them on the soil and screwed them to short vertical posts bashed into the soil to hold them up and keep them firm.  We have gravel paths between the beds on a weed supressing membrane.  Here's a picture of part of it with the old blue stained pine boards - http://s211.photobucket.com/user/Obelixx_be/media/2008%20garden/080826005.jpg.html?sort=2&o=71

 

Pulmonaria! :)

Posted: 08/12/2013 at 18:10

You can refresh pulmonaria foliage.  Once the spring flush of flowers is over just cut them back, liek you would a hardy geraniuml, give thema  scattering of pelleted chicken manure and a good drink and they'll grow fresh foliage and look good all summer.

Recommended Brands

Posted: 08/12/2013 at 11:01

Wolf system for me too.  I have a board hung on the garage wall with screws to hang the various heads and a range of handle lengths from hand tool to full length for assorted hoe, cultivator, weed puller and rake heads and a medium length for the lawn edger tool.  There's also a pruning saw and a barrow thing for distributing lawn weed and feed and I have two or three trowels.

Wolf loppers are good too but Felco every time for secateurs.

Stainless steel border fork and spade.

Best dogwoods for stem colour

Posted: 08/12/2013 at 10:52

My Midwinter Fire is happy as Larry.   So happy in fact that two have become more than 12 as the perishers sucker and spread.   I dug one up to move it to a more visible spot and the next year a dozen new shrubs had grown in the original spot.

As said, it isn't as robust as the bright red alba sibirica forms so I thin, rather than stool it to keep the fresh stem colour going.  The bright red alba sibirica also suckers but not as badly and can be cut back hard every year to maintain a reasonable size and renew stem colour.   Looks stunning even on dull days.

I have the green stemmed one - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=2524 - and it looks great in low winter sun as does - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=531 - the one with mahogany stems and variegated leaves which give added interest through summer..

There is also a purple form - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=5352 - which is on my wish list.

Pulmonaria! :)

Posted: 07/12/2013 at 11:27

It self seeds very easily as well as spreading naturally.  There are many variations of leaf form and flower colour available so I suggest you just go and buy a few of your favourites to start you off.

Late summer flowering clematis

Posted: 05/12/2013 at 16:20

Clematis roots are very thick and felshy and go deep down.   It will be very difficult to move a mature plant without damaging the roots.

Half of my clematis struggled to flower well this year and I put it down to a long, cold, wet spring which made them late to get going followed by a baking hot summer.  I think yours will be fine next year if given a good thick mulch of well rotted manure or garden compost any time now when the ground is wet but not frozen and another next spring when growth starts and you prune out the old stems.  You can then also apply some slow release clematis feed and a liquid tonic of rose or tomato fertiliser.

If we have another hot dry spell, just give it a good drink - at least a gallon /5litres a time - a couple of times a week.

Welly boots

Posted: 05/12/2013 at 16:15

I have 3 pairs of wellies - one for bare feet in summer, one for one pair of socks in spring and autumn and one for 2 pairs of socks or ski socks in winter.

Stretching wellies is asking for leaks.

Shredder

Posted: 04/12/2013 at 22:53

Hello Berghill.   I'd been hoping you'd get some answers to this as OH is talking of getting a chipper/shredder.  Have you tried asking on A4A?

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