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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

acers

Posted: 02/10/2014 at 13:26

If water is going tsraight through it indicates that teh compost is dry and unable to absorb water.   Try taking out the plant with its root ball and soaking it in a bucket of water till all air bubbles stop rising.    Then pot up in a slightly larger pot if you can making sure there are crocks over the drainage holes and adding fresh compost at the base and sides of the old rootball.

If you can't use a bigger pot; trim off the bottom inch or two of the root ball using an old bread knife then use fresh crocs and compost in the base when you put it back in its pot.   Scrape away a bit of the top compost and add fresh then water well and top dress with a mulch of gravel or wood chips which will make it look good and help prevent evaporation of moisture.   

Clematis

Posted: 02/10/2014 at 07:18

All clematis are thirsty, hungry plants.   As long as theye are planted deeply enough theye don't need shaded roots but they do need food and water.    You may not have teh same good soil as grandma so I would advise you give the plants a good mulch of well rotted garden compost now and again everys pring as well as a handful of blood fish and bone around the roots in spring and a liquid feed of rose or tomato food.

The other thing to note is that both of these are group 3s which means they need to be pruned back hard in spring to a low pair of buds on each stem once the worst of the frosts are over.  You then remove all the brown, woody stems and feed the plants as above and they should grow fresh new stems which will flower all summer.

dehydrating chilli peppers

Posted: 01/10/2014 at 08:23

I live in Belgium which is also damp and grey in winter.   I dried my chilllies last year by threading them through the stalks on sewing thread and then hung them in my south facing kithcen window  in full sun (when there was any).  

There were red, yellow and purple ones so they looked very decorative and dried beautifully.

Late perennials for the white garden

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 21:09

If your soil is acid and moist, try cornus canadensis.

If not, bergenia Bressingham White and Silberlicht, parahebe catarractae 'Delight', cistus 'decumbens', pachysandra terminalis variegata, cistus x cyprius,  vinca minor Gerturde Jekyll, sarcococca.

 

Bulbs, bulbs and more bulbs!

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 09:25

Keep it simple whatever you do.  I once did an ambitious 7 layers in a 60cm pot and it was a mess with foliage going over on the early bulbs and spoiling the display of the later ones.   They didn't all like the competition either and some came up short.

Reviving a Camelia

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 09:21

You do if you're using hard tap water.   Calcim locks up the iron and makes it inaccessible to ericaceous plants so they get anaemic.   Sequestered iron is accesible and will resolve the problem. 

Bulbs, bulbs and more bulbs!

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 08:54

I would keep it simple and do no more than 3 layers of bulbs that succeed each other in flowering times eg tall tulips in the bottom as they require the deepest planting depth and will flower in April/May, then daffs for March and crocuses for February.

Bluebells are best naturalised in a woodland corner under trees or shrubs.   Snowdrops don't like to dry out so are also best in the ground where they will also spread themselves.   I find hyacinths have such a strong perfume they are best in a pot by themselves so they can be brought into prominence when in flower and moved out of the way when they go over.

I like alliums best coming up through perennials such as hardy geraniums and they are good plants to put near roses as they help deter greenfly.

anyone here ever coppiced a starndard tree successfully?

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 08:25

I had a beautiful parrotia persica (Persian Ironwood) which was 12 years old and whose crown I had lifted so I could see the form and bark of its stems.  It was cut down last summer by a lightening strike so I had to cut it right at the base.    It has resprouted and will make a good multi stemmed shrub.

I should have thought an amelanchier would do the same but be sure to cut it when there are no frosts forecast so the wound can heal well and before the sap starts rising in late Jan/early Feb.  

Reviving a Camelia

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 08:16

It's the calcium content in tap water that is bad for ericaceous plants, not the other chemcals so leaving it to stand will not help.  However you can buy sequestered iron in good garden centres and add that to water to help plants take up the iron they need.

Camellias, rhodos and azaleas need plentiful water in late summer and autumn to ripen their flower buds for spring.   Soak the root ball in water to make it easier to pull out all those weeds then pot up in a bigger pot, if possible, and use good ericaceous compost.   Put out a container to collect rain water for it if you can.

Yellow leaves (chlorosis) on green plants can be caused by lack of nutrients, lack of iron and also lack of magnesium.   If they persist after all the TLC, use a solution of 1 tbs of Epsom salts dissolved in a gallon of water and spray it over the foliage next spring.   Repeat as necessary with this and any other plant with similar problems.

Fuchsia

Posted: 30/09/2014 at 08:08

That's what I do for hardy fuchsias too as leaving the tops on helps protect the crown from frosts and then you prune back to healthy buds in spring after the worst of the frosts.    I would also mulch the crown with some well rotted garden compost or spent potting compost as further protection and take a few cuttings as insurance.

For tender fuchsias, they need lifting soon and taking into shelter.   I would also take cuttings as insurance.

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