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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Pruning Roses

Posted: 14/11/2015 at 16:55

Yes, cut back the longer stems by a third to a half now to reduce possible wind damage.  Leave the serious pruning and shaping till spring.

In Feb or March, when the worst frosts are over and none is forecast for a few days, cut out all dead, damaged and spindly stems to their base.   For the remaining stems, cut each one back to an outward facing bud, cutting just above and at an angle so that raindrops don't sit on the wound and encourage rotting.   Leave the centre of the rose as open as possible as this encourages air flow and reduces the risk of disease.

When done, feed the plants generously with slow release blood, fish and bone and/or a specialist rose food.   Mulch the roots with some well rotted garden compost of horse manure if you can get it and give occasional liquid feeds of rose or tomato food from March till the first flowers open.   Keep dead-heading all spent flowers throughout the season to encourage new buds to form and your roses should keep flowering into November or December depending on the weather conditions. 

stormy weather

Posted: 14/11/2015 at 14:39

Trouble is that people don't heed common sense rules about having adequate clothing for going out.  Have you seen what people wear just to out in the streets in wet weather let alone to go hiking on foot in hills and valleys with local extreme weather conditions a distinct possibility.   And how many people have emergency supplies in cars - chocolate, water and blankets for areas or times of the year where snow storms or heavy rains can block roads for hours if not days?

 It costs a fortune to mount a rescue for some idiot that thinks it's OK to walk on Ben Nevis without appropriate gear and/or without checking the weather conditions and why should good people put themselves at risk to help eejits?

 

 

Beech hedging advise

Posted: 14/11/2015 at 11:31

Remember to soak the roots in a bucket of water overnight before planting.  That way the stay hydrated and grow away faster.  Left dry they may just die.

RHS Garden

Posted: 14/11/2015 at 11:14

Or you could get it straight from the horse's mouth - https://www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/blogs/RHS-Gardens/new-rhs-garden-announced 

Excellent news!

Planting a conifer - help on selection

Posted: 13/11/2015 at 13:57

For some people, plant shops and plant fairs are like sweet shops - full of irresistible goodies that just have to come home with you.

compost

Posted: 13/11/2015 at 12:43

The trick to avoiding problems with pernicious weeds surviving in the compost heap is to leave them to dry out and die before adding them.   I do this with creeping buttercup, dandelions and the green parts of bindweed.

Anything containing bindweed roots or horsetail goes on a heap to be burned.

It's my birthday

Posted: 13/11/2015 at 10:43

Happy birthday Wintersong.  I hope you're not being basted to bits by Abigail and will indulge in some appropriate celebration this evening.

Allotment websites

Posted: 13/11/2015 at 10:39

Take a look at A4A and other allotment blogs and see what you like that can be applied to you own site.  

Talk to your members about what they would like to see there - eg:- tips and guides on sowing and planting times, crop rotation, soil prep, seed and seedling swaps, surplus crops swaps, recipes for produce, shared seed/manure/compost orders to cut costs, advice on growing more unusual crops etc.

Make sure they know about your website and, if technologically challenged by a lack of PC skills or access, help them work it out.

Clematis dried leaves

Posted: 12/11/2015 at 14:51

Clematis in pots need to be watered regularly by the gardener.  Rain is not enough eve if it's bucketing down.  Plus, in a pot the clematis will soon run short of nutrients as most planting composts only have enough to feed plants for 90 days so, the answer is to plant it in the ground, nice and deep to encourage new shoots and, whether it's in a pot or in the ground, make sure it never gets thirsty or hungry.

As Richard says, knowing the name would help with further advice.

Allotment websites

Posted: 11/11/2015 at 17:34

Yes.  A4A has some very knowledgeable and helpful contributors with topics on everything from growing to eating the produce plus chat and fun too.

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